Car insurance calculator: Free cost estimator (2023)

Estimate the cost to insure your car with the Policygenius free auto insurance calculator.

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By

Andrew HurstAndrew HurstSenior Editor & Licensed Auto Insurance ExpertAndrew Hurst is a senior editor and a licensed auto insurance expert at Policygenius. His work has also been featured in The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal, Forbes, USA Today, NPR, Mic, Insurance Business Magazine, ValuePenguin, and Property Casualty 360.

Edited by

Anna SwartzAnna SwartzSenior Managing Editor & Auto Insurance ExpertAnna Swartz is a senior managing editor and auto insurance expert at Policygenius, where she oversees our car insurance coverage. Previously, she was a senior staff writer at Mic.com, as well as an associate writer at The Dodo.
Expert reviewedExpert reviewedThis article has been reviewed by a licensed Policygenius expert to ensure that sources, statistics, and claims meet our standard for accurate and unbiased advice.Learn more about oureditorial review process.

By

Britta M. MossBritta M. MossProperty & casualty claim consultant and expert witnessBritta M. Moss, CPCU, SCLA, AIC-M, has over 25 years of insurance industry experience. In her work as a property and casualty claim consultant, she provides consultation and expert witness services in claim handling standards, practices, and norms.  She has been retained by law firms representing plaintiffs and those representing insurer defendants involved in disputes or litigation regarding coverage analysis, investigation, liability determination, damage evaluation, negotiation and settlement.  She is a graduate of The Ohio State University. 

Updated|6 min read

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Car insurance cost calculator

Estimate how much you'll pay for coverage, instantly.

Some car insurance companies only allow you to select female or male for gender when you apply. Choose whichever best matches your gender identity.
Most companies look at the last three to five years of your driving record.
If you live in CA, HI, MA, MI, or WA, insurance companies can't use your credit score to set your rates. Credit ranges are based on Experian scores.
Homeowners can often save on car insurance through policy bundles and other discounts.

Monthly estimates

Budget coverage 

Coverage includes:

  • $50,000 per person for medical expenses in an at-fault accident
  • $100,000 per accident for medical expenses in an at-fault accident
  • $50,000 per accident for property damage expenses in an at-fault accident
$

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Average coverage 

Coverage includes:

  • $100,000 per person for medical expenses in an at-fault accident
  • $300,000 per accident for medical expenses in an at-fault accident
  • $100,000 per accident for property damage expenses in an at-fault accident
$

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Highest coverage 

Coverage includes:

  • $250,000 per person for medical expenses in an at-fault accident
  • $500,000 per accident for medical expenses in an at-fault accident
  • $250,000 per accident for property damage expenses in an at-fault accident
$

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We don’t sell your information to third parties.

How we calculate your rates
We looked at over 25,000 car insurance quotes provided to real Policygenius shoppers to estimate costs based on the following criteria:
  • State:Rates depend on where you live. Areas with high rates of crime or accidents may have higher insurance costs.
  • Age:Younger drivers (under 25 years old) and older drivers (over 65 years old) typically have higher-than-average rates. Discounts can offset increased costs.
  • Gender:Male drivers generally pay slightly more than female drivers for car insurance.
  • Driving record:Any recent violations, especially serious ones like a DUI, will raise your car insurance rates.
  • Credit scores:A lower credit score usually means you’ll pay more for car insurance, except in a handful of states.
  • Home ownership:Buying both your home and auto insurance through the same company is one of the best ways to save on the cost of insurance. Companies may offer an additional discount for owning a home on top of that.

These car insurance estimates are for educational purposes only and shouldn't take the place of professional advice. Your coverage needs may vary based on other factors not considered here, like vehicle make and model or additional drivers. Interested in more personalized quotes? Compare for free online, or call 1-855-695-2255 to speak with one of our licensed agents.

Getting estimates before you buy car insurance is an easy way to make sure you don’t pay more than you have to for coverage. Lots of factors affect what you pay for car insurance coverage, including your location, age, driving history, and more.

Policygenius has saved drivers an average of $435 per year on their car insurance. Our free calculator makes it easy to see what you'll pay for coverage.

What affects your car insurance estimate

While the average driver pays $1,638 per year for car insurance, every driver will see different estimates for car insurance depending on a range of factors. Some of the details that go into your car insurance estimate are:

Where you live

Drivers in one state may pay hundreds of dollars more for auto insurance coverage than drivers in another, depending on things like the required amounts of auto insurance in that state, or the total number of uninsured drivers. Even your ZIP code matters when it comes to insurance, since drivers in crowded cities usually pay more for car insurance than people who live in places with fewer cars on the road.

Your age

All car insurance calculators ask for your age before you can get an estimate. Car insurance companies charge older drivers much less than younger, more inexperienced drivers. If you're younger than 25 or you have a teen driver in your household, your insurance will be more expensive

The good news is that car insurance rates for young drivers tend to fall for every year they go without an accident, and usually level out when they turn 25 and are no longer in the highest-risk age group.

Your credit history

Car insurance companies use your credit score to calculate your rates. If you have a poor credit history, you’ll get significantly higher estimates for auto insurance than if you had good — or even average — credit. But not every state allows car insurance companies to consider your credit score. If you live in California, Hawaii, Massachusetts, Michigan, or Washington, your credit score won't affect your car insurance rates.

Any recent accidents or traffic violations

Along with past claims, any accidents, traffic violations, speeding tickets, DUIs, or other marks on your driving record will make your car insurance more expensive. Car insurance companies generally consider the past three to five years of your driving record, so if you drive safely going forward, violations can eventually "fall off" your history and your rates will go back to normal.

→ Read about how much insurance costs for different drivers

Calculating how much car insurance you need

You need at least the amount of car insurance coverage that’s required by law — but what else do you need in a policy? 

Most drivers need what’s called full-coverage car insurance, which is a policy that includes comprehensive and collision coverages. We also recommend getting as much liability coverage as you can afford.

A solid full-coverage policy might look like:

  • Bodily injury liability coverage: $100,00 per person, $300,000 per accident

  • Property damage liability coverage: $100,000 per accident

  • Uninsured/underinsured motorist coverage: $100,000 per person, $300,000 per accident

  • Comprehensive: $500 deductible

  • Collision: $500 deductible

Genius tip

Remember: Getting as much liability coverage as you can afford means you won’t have to pay expensive bills out of pocket after a crash.

If you live in a no-fault state, you’ll also be required to get personal injury protection (PIP), which pays for your medical bills after an accident. 

A typical full-coverage policy at our recommended limits costs $1,827 a year. But there are other add-ons that can raise your rates, so set your budget a little higher if you want things like roadside assistance, gap insurance, or new car replacement coverage.

→ Learn more about how much car insurance you need

How to get accurate car insurance estimates

Before you buy a car insurance policy, make sure you take these steps to get the most accurate estimates:

  1. Understand your coverage options

  2. Decide how much you want to pay

  3. Get estimates from multiple companies

1. Understand your coverage options

A car insurance policy is made up of different types of coverage that offer different types of protection. Depending on where you live, some may be required while others are always optional.

  • Bodily injury liability coverage (BIL): Pays for injuries to the other driver or their passengers if you’re responsible for an accident.

  • Property damage liability coverage (PDL): Covers damage to the other driver’s car after an at-fault accident. Also covers other property damage you’re responsible for, like if you crash into someone’s fence.

  • Uninsured or underinsured motorist protection (UI/UM): Pays for your own injuries or property damage if you’re hit by a driver without insurance (or without enough insurance to cover the accident).

  • Comprehensive coverage: Covers the cost of damage not caused by a car accident, like damage from extreme weather, falling objects, theft, vandalism, or animals..

  • Collision coverage: Covers damage to your own car after an at-fault accident.

  • Personal injury protection (PIP): Pays for your own medical expenses after an accident, regardless of who was at-fault (PIP is required in no-fault states)..

These types of car insurance coverage typically make up what’s called a full-coverage policy, but there are other coverage add-ons you may want to consider, including  roadside assistance, new car replacement, and rental car reimbursement coverage. 

When you buy a policy, you'll also have to choose a deductible amount for certain types of coverage, like comprehensive and collision coverage. A car insurance deductible is the amount you'll need to pay out of pocket per-claim. Setting a higher deductible means lower rates, but it also means you'll need to foot more of the bill yourself if you ever actually need to use your coverage.

→ Read more about what types of coverage a regular insurance policy includes

2. Decide how much you want to pay

A car insurance premium is just the amount you pay for coverage. The more coverage you buy, the more expensive your car insurance estimates will be.

For example, if you only buy enough insurance to meet your state's minimum requirements, your estimated insurance cost may be an average of 66% (or $1,184 per year) cheaper than a full-coverage policy that includes higher limits of liability coverage and comprehensive and collision protection. 

We recommend getting as much liability coverage as you can afford, along with comprehensive and collision coverage. While getting fully covered means your insurance estimates will be higher, it's the best way to avoid paying for expensive medical bills and property damage out of pocket after a serious car accident. 

Set an amount you’re comfortable paying per month or per year so you can shop around for the company that offers you the most coverage at the cheapest rates.

3. Get estimates from multiple companies

Once you have an idea of how much coverage you need and what you can afford to pay for car insurance, you can get estimates for rates in your area. To get the best insurance rates from a car insurance estimator, you should know your: 

  • Address, including city and state

  • Birthdates for every driver in your household

  • Driver's license numbers

  • Social Security Numbers

  • The make, model, and VIN for every vehicle you want on the policy

  • Your current coverage limits (if you already have insurance)

Remember to be honest when you're applying for car insurance — if you fudge any details to get a lower rate (like omitting a recent accident or not including your teenage driver), you won't get an accurate estimate.

It's also a good idea to research the insurance companies with the lowest rates to make sure they don't have poor customer service or limited coverage options. When you've found the best company for your needs, you can purchase a policy.

Highlights from some of our favorite companies

Geico Logo

GEICO

Rating: 4.6/5 ★

Cost for full coverage: $99/month

Cost for minimum coverage: $33/month

State Farm Logo

State Farm

Rating: 3.8/5 ★

Cost for full coverage: $98/month

Cost for minimum coverage: $40/month

Travelers Logo

Travelers

Rating: 4.3/5 ★

Cost for full coverage: $125/month

Cost for minimum coverage: $57/month

Nationwide Logo P&C

Nationwide

Rating: 3.8/5 ★

Cost for full coverage: $123/month

Cost for minimum coverage: $52/month

Progressive logo newer

Progressive

Rating: 4.1/5 ★

Cost for full coverage: $148/month

Cost for minimum coverage: $61/month

Allstate

Allstate

Rating: 4.0/5 ★

Cost for full coverage: $165/month

Cost for minimum coverage: $62/month

How we rated car insurance companies

Our company ratings are based on each insurance provider’s cost, availability, customer experience and satisfaction, and strength of coverage and how it stacks up against competitors. Our own Policygenius agents, with years of experience working with real car insurance shoppers, also provided insight.

We assigned a value to each measurement based on importance, then found the weighted average of these values for each company. We ranked the highest performing companies for different types of drivers by their final score. Our rating system breaks down like this:

  • Customer experience and satisfaction (29%), combining ratings from a number of well-known third-party quality reviewers, including J.D. Power’s Auto Insurance Claims Satisfaction study.
  • Ease-of-use (29%), evaluating companies on how easy it is to get covered and make a claim.
  • Coverage options (24%), totaling up the number of coverage options and perks, and the strength of coverage.
  • Cost (12%), comparing the costs of a full-coverage policy relative to average.
  • Financial security (6%), using A.M. Best’s credit rating scores.

Compare rates and shop affordable car insurance today

We don't sell your information to third parties.

How car insurance is calculated in every state

Every state aside from New Hampshire and Virginia requires drivers to have liability coverage. When you’re calculating how much insurance you need, start with the amount of coverage your state requires.

But state minimums aren’t the only thing that affect car insurance costs.

The number of uninsured drivers in your area, local crime rates, and the number of accidents where you live can all affect what you’ll pay for car insurance.

Compare rates and shop affordable car insurance today

We don't sell your information to third parties.

Since it’s impossible to predict exactly what you’ll pay for car insurance without entering at least some personal information, the best way to get a reliable estimate is by comparing quotes from different companies.

Here's how much insurance you need (by law) in every state:

How to get lower car insurance estimates

If you find that car insurance calculators are giving you high estimates for the amount of coverage you want, there are a few ways that you can bring down your rates and still get the protection you need. 

  1. Compare rates from multiple companies: By getting quotes from more than one company before you buy, you can make sure that you're getting the best and cheapest rates in your area.

  2. Check for insurance discounts: Nearly every insurance company will offer you at least a few ways to save on coverage. Some discounts are relatively easy to qualify for, including switching to paperless billing, requesting a quote online, and paying your premiums electronically.

  3. Avoid accidents and traffic violations: While you're likely to get higher premiums from insurance rate estimators if you have an accident or ticket on your record, your rates will get more affordable over time as long as you remain a safe driver.

  4. Improve your credit: While improving your credit score can take months, or even years, your insurance estimates will be lower if you  pay down outstanding debts and credit card balances.

  5. Bundle coverage: When you get car insurance and home insurance from the same company, you can often get significant discounts on both — savings of up to 20% with some insurance companies.

Frequently Asked Questions

Which company has the cheapest car insurance estimates?

GEICO typically has the cheapest estimates for most people. USAA offers the most affordable insurance overall, but the insurer only sells coverage to active or retired members of the military and their families.

How do you get an insurance estimate before you buy a car?

You can still get insurance estimates for a car you don't own yet. You can get an estimate as long as you have your address and the car's make and model. While the quote you get won't be exact, it will give you an idea of what you could pay for coverage. Then, once you know the exact car you’re buying, you can add the VIN and exact details and buy your policy for the day you want to take your new vehicle home.

What do you need to check car insurance prices online?

You only need a few details in order to check car insurance prices online. To get insurance estimates, you'll need to know the names and Social Security Numbers of everyone in your household, license numbers, your car's model and VIN number, and the amount of coverage you want.

Do car insurance estimators show yearly or monthly prices?

It depends. Car insurance estimators often display rates on a monthly or bi-annual basis. Fortunately, if you're looking for estimates for your annual cost of car insurance, it's not hard to convert monthly or six-month rates into annual premiums.

Average savings of $435/yr (auto insurance): Savings are determined by calculating the average difference between the lowest and second lowest auto insurance policy estimates provided to shoppers with two or more estimates between 06/01/2020 and 05/18/2021. Potential savings are based on a composite of multiple different contracts and insurers. Not all policies in this calculation are available in all states, and availability may be based on eligibility. Savings may vary by policy amount and location.

Author

Andrew Hurst is a senior editor and a licensed auto insurance expert at Policygenius. His work has also been featured in The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal, Forbes, USA Today, NPR, Mic, Insurance Business Magazine, ValuePenguin, and Property Casualty 360.

Editor

Anna Swartz is a senior managing editor and auto insurance expert at Policygenius, where she oversees our car insurance coverage. Previously, she was a senior staff writer at Mic.com, as well as an associate writer at The Dodo.

Expert reviewer

Britta M. Moss, CPCU, SCLA, AIC-M, has over 25 years of insurance industry experience. In her work as a property and casualty claim consultant, she provides consultation and expert witness services in claim handling standards, practices, and norms.  She has been retained by law firms representing plaintiffs and those representing insurer defendants involved in disputes or litigation regarding coverage analysis, investigation, liability determination, damage evaluation, negotiation and settlement.  She is a graduate of The Ohio State University. 

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