Q

How much car insurance is required in all 50 states

A

From Alaska to California and Indiana to New York, each state has minimum car insurance requirements. Find your state's guidelines so you're protected.

Colin Lalley 1600Kara McGinley

Colin Lalley & Kara McGinley

Published May 20, 2020

All but two states require drivers to have car insurance. That said, there is no one country-wide rule when it comes to how much car insurance you have to have. Each state has a different minimum amount of car insurance that drivers must obtain in order to legally drive on public roads. In other words, how much auto insurance coverage you legally need depends on the state you live in.

Some states only require liability insurance, which covers bodily injury (BI) and property damage (PD) you do to someone else. Other states might require extra medical coverage or what’s often known as personal injury protection (PIP), which covers health care bills you or your passengers incur. And some states might require uninsured and/or underinsured motorist insurance, but then in other states this type of coverage could be optional.

Collision and comprehensive coverage, are always optional no matter what state you live in, but they are still important protection nonetheless

If you’re confused, there's good news: You really only have to worry about the requirements where you live, so you can jump to your home state and make sure your coverage fits the mandatory minimums.

In this article:

What types of car insurance coverage are required?

Car insurance requirements vary, but nearly all states require drivers to have some amount of liability coverage. Other components of car insurance are required in some states and not in others, but it’s important to familiarize yourself with the types of coverage that make up a car insurance policy. Below we broke down the basic components of what’s typically referred to as a “full coverage” car insurance policy:

Coverage TypeWhat It Does
Bodily injury liabilityThe part of your liability coverage that pays for medical bills if you've injured someone in an accident
Property damage liabilityThe other part of liability coverage, covers the cost of property damage you've caused in an accident
Personal injury protectionCovers medical expenses for you or your passengers after an accident
Uninsured/underinsured motoristCovers the costs if you're in an accident caused by a driver with little or no car insurance
ComprehensiveCovers damage to your car that happens when you're not driving
CollisionCovers damage to your car after a car accident, no matter who was at fault

Like we mentioned above, comprehensive and collision coverage are optional in every state, yet this type of coverage offers valuable protection for your vehicle, which isn’t covered by your liability coverage. Comprehensive coverage covers damage that happens to your car when you’re not driving, like from falling objects, or weather damage, like hail. Comprehensive coverage also pays to replace your car if it’s stolen. And collision coverage covers damage from collisions no matter who was at fault.

Learn more about comprehensive and collision coverage

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Car insurance requirements for all 50 states

You need to meet the minimum amount of car insurance requirement based on the state you live in, meaning your permanent address. If you move out of state, you might need to add additional car insurance coverage to your policy based on your new state’s requirements.

Alabama

  • Bodily injury liability coverage per person: $25,000
  • Bodily injury liability coverage per accident: $50,000
  • Property damage liability coverage: $25,000
  • Personal injury protection: Optional
  • Uninsured/underinsured motorist coverage: Optional

Alaska

  • Bodily injury liability coverage per person: $50,000
  • Bodily injury liability coverage per accident: $100,000
  • Property damage liability coverage: $25,000
  • Personal injury protection: Optional
  • Uninsured/underinsured motorist coverage: Optional

Arizona

  • Bodily injury liability coverage per person: $15,000
  • Bodily injury liability coverage per accident: $30,000
  • Property damage liability coverage: $10,000
  • Personal injury protection: Optional
  • Uninsured/underinsured motorist coverage: Optional

Arkansas

  • Bodily injury liability coverage per person: $25,000
  • Bodily injury liability coverage per accident: $50,000
  • Property damage liability coverage: $25,000
  • Personal injury protection: Optional
  • Uninsured/underinsured motorist coverage: Optional

California

  • Bodily injury liability coverage per person: $15,000
  • Bodily injury liability coverage per accident: $30,000
  • Property damage liability coverage: $5,000
  • Personal injury protection: Optional
  • Uninsured/underinsured motorist coverage: Optional

Notes: California also helps low-income drivers who otherwise would not procure car insurance get a policy through the California Automobile Assigned Risk Plan. The minimum liability limits for one of these policies is 15/30/5.

Colorado

  • Bodily injury liability coverage per person: $25,000
  • Bodily injury liability coverage per accident: $50,000
  • Property damage liability coverage: $15,000
  • Personal injury protection: Optional
  • Uninsured/underinsured motorist coverage: Optional

Connecticut

  • Bodily injury liability coverage per person: $25,000
  • Bodily injury liability coverage per accident: $50,000
  • Property damage liability coverage per accident: $50,000
  • Personal injury protection: Optional
  • Uninsured/underinsured motorist coverage: $25,000 per person; $50,000 per accident

Delaware

  • Bodily injury liability coverage per person: $25,000
  • Bodily injury liability coverage per accident: $50,000
  • Property damage liability coverage: $10,000
  • Personal injury protection: $15,000 per person; $30,000 per accident
  • Uninsured/underinsured motorist coverage: Optional

District of Columbia

  • Bodily injury liability coverage per person: $25,000
  • Bodily injury liability coverage per accident: $50,000
  • Property damage liability coverage: $10,000
  • Personal injury protection: Optional
  • Uninsured/underinsured motorist coverage: $25,000 BI per person; $50,000 BI per accident and $5,000 PD per accident

Florida

  • Bodily injury liability coverage per person: Optional, unless otherwise specified by the state ($10,000)
  • Bodily injury liability coverage per accident: Optional, unless otherwise specified by the state ($20,000)
  • Property damage liability coverage: $10,000
  • Personal injury protection: $10,000
  • Uninsured/underinsured motorist coverage: Optional

Georgia

  • Bodily injury liability coverage per person: $25,000
  • Bodily injury liability coverage per accident: $50,000
  • Property damage liability coverage: $25,000
  • Personal injury protection: Optional
  • Uninsured/underinsured motorist coverage: Optional

Hawaii

  • Bodily injury liability coverage per person: $20,000
  • Bodily injury liability coverage per accident: $40,000
  • Property damage liability coverage: $10,000
  • Personal injury protection: $10,000
  • Uninsured/underinsured motorist coverage: Optional

Idaho

  • Bodily injury liability coverage per person: $25,000
  • Bodily injury liability coverage per accident: $50,000
  • Property damage liability coverage: $15,000
  • Personal injury protection: Optional
  • Uninsured/underinsured motorist coverage: Optional

Illinois

  • Bodily injury liability coverage per person: $25,000
  • Bodily injury liability coverage per accident: $50,000
  • Property damage liability coverage: $20,000
  • Personal injury protection: Optional
  • Uninsured motorist bodily injury coverage: $25,000 per person; $50,000 per accident
  • Underinsured motorist coverage: Optional

Indiana

  • Bodily injury liability coverage per person: $25,000
  • Bodily injury liability coverage per accident: $50,000
  • Property damage liability coverage: $25,000
  • Uninsured motorist bodily injury: $25,000 per person and $50,000 per accident
  • Personal injury protection: Optional
  • Uninsured/underinsured motorist coverage: Optional

Notes: Indiana specifies insurers include UM/UMI at $25,000 per person and $50,000 per accident unless it is expressly rejected in writing.

Iowa

  • Bodily injury liability coverage per person: $20,000
  • Bodily injury liability coverage per accident: $40,000
  • Property damage liability coverage: $15,000
  • Personal injury protection: Optional
  • Uninsured/underinsured motorist coverage: Optional

Kansas

  • Bodily injury liability coverage per person: $25,000
  • Bodily injury liability coverage per accident: $50,000
  • Property damage liability coverage: $25,000
  • Personal injury protection: $4,500 per accident
  • Uninsured/underinsured motorist coverage: $25,000 per person; $50,000 per accident

Kentucky

  • Bodily injury liability coverage per person: $25,000
  • Bodily injury liability coverage per accident: $50,000
  • Property damage liability coverage: $10,000
  • Personal injury protection: $10,000 per accident, however PIP coverage can be rejected in writing
  • Uninsured/underinsured motorist coverage: Optional, but Kentucky specifies the insurer include UM/UMI at $25,000 per person and $50,000 per accident unless you expressly reject it in writing.

Louisiana

  • Bodily injury liability coverage per person: $15,000
  • Bodily injury liability coverage per accident: $30,000
  • Property damage liability coverage: $25,000
  • Personal injury protection: Optional
  • Uninsured/underinsured motorist coverage: Optional

Maine

  • Bodily injury liability coverage per person: $50,000
  • Bodily injury liability coverage per accident: $100,000
  • Property damage liability coverage: $25,000
  • Personal injury protection: While not technically PIP since it applies solely to medical expenses, Maine requires motorists to carry $2,000 in coverage for any injuries they or their passengers incur.
  • Uninsured/underinsured motorist coverage: $50,000 per person; $100,000 per accident

Maryland

  • Bodily injury liability coverage per person: $30,000
  • Bodily injury liability coverage per accident: $60,000
  • Property damage liability coverage: $15,000
  • Personal injury protection: $2,500 per incident
  • Uninsured/underinsured motorist coverage: $30,000 per person; $60,000 per incident; and $15,000 in PD coverage

Massachusetts

  • Bodily injury liability coverage per person: $20,000
  • Bodily injury liability coverage per accident: $40,000
  • Property damage liability coverage: $5,000
  • Personal injury protection: $8,000 per person in accident
  • Uninsured/underinsured motorist coverage: $20,000 per person; $40,000 per incident.

Michigan

  • Bodily injury liability coverage per person: $20,000
  • Bodily injury liability coverage per accident: $40,000
  • Property damage liability coverage: $10,000
  • Personal injury protection: Amount varies depending on health insurance (see notes)
  • Uninsured/underinsured motorist coverage: Optional

Notes: Michigan requires drivers to carry PIP coverage, though the exact amount required depends on the type and amount of health insurance coverage they have. Michigan also requires property protection insurance (PPI), with a minimum limit of $1 million in property damage coverage. PPI can cover damages regardless of who caused the accident, as Michigan is a no fault state.

Minnesota

  • Bodily injury liability coverage per person: $30,000
  • Bodily injury liability coverage per accident: $60,000
  • Property damage liability coverage: $10,000
  • Personal injury protection: $20,000 per accident; $20,000 for loss of income per accident
  • Uninsured/underinsured motorist coverage: $25,000 per person; $50,000 per accident

Mississippi

  • Bodily injury liability coverage per person: $25,000
  • Bodily injury liability coverage per accident: $50,000
  • Property damage liability coverage: $25,000
  • Personal injury protection: Optional
  • Uninsured/underinsured motorist coverage: Optional

Missouri

  • Bodily injury liability coverage per person: $25,000
  • Bodily injury liability coverage per accident: $50,000
  • Property damage liability coverage: $25,000
  • Personal injury protection: Optional
  • Uninsured/underinsured motorist coverage: $25,000 per person; $50,000 per incident

Montana

  • Bodily injury liability coverage per person: $25,000
  • Bodily injury liability coverage per accident: $50,000
  • Property damage liability coverage: $20,000
  • Personal injury protection: Optional
  • Uninsured/underinsured motorist coverage: Optional

Notes: Insurers have to offer uninsured/underinsured motorist coverage but it can be declined by the driver in writing.

Nebraska

  • Bodily injury liability coverage per person: $25,000
  • Bodily injury liability coverage per accident: $50,000
  • Property damage liability coverage: $25,000
  • Personal injury protection: Optional
  • Uninsured/underinsured motorist coverage: $25,000 per person; $50,000 per accident

Nevada

  • Bodily injury liability coverage per person: $25,000
  • Bodily injury liability coverage per accident: $50,000
  • Property damage liability coverage: $50,000
  • Personal injury protection: Optional
  • Uninsured/underinsured motorist coverage: $25,000 per person and $50,000 per accident

New Hampshire

  • Bodily injury liability coverage per person: Legally optional, but, if purchased, $25,000
  • Bodily injury liability coverage per accident: Legally optional, but, if purchased, $50,000
  • Property damage liability coverage: Legally optional, but, if purchased, $25,000
  • Personal injury protection: Legally optional, but, if purchased, $1,000 per accident for medical expenses solely.
  • Uninsured/underinsured motorist coverage: Legally optional, but, if purchased, must match your liability limits.

Notes: New Hampshire doesn’t mandate drivers carry car insurance. However, motorists are still responsible for paying for bodily injury and property damages if they cause a car accident. (The easiest way to do this? Insurance.) And, if you do choose to buy car insurance in New Hampshire, you must meet the minimums above. If you can’t afford to buy car insurance, you may get coverage through the New Hampshire Automobile Insurance Plan.

New Jersey

  • Bodily injury liability coverage per person: $15,000 (Standard)
  • Bodily injury liability coverage per accident: $30,000 (Standard)
  • Property damage liability coverage: $5,000 (Basic/Standard)
  • Personal injury protection: $15,000 per accident, plus up to $250,000 for severe injuries for a standard policy (Basic/Standard)
  • Uninsured/underinsured motorist coverage: Must match liability limits if purchasing a standard policy

Notes: New Jersey mandates motorists carry Basic or Standard policy. The Basic Policy, a result of the Automobile Insurance Cost Reduction Act, costs less but provides limited coverage (with no bodily injury liability available).

New Mexico

  • Bodily injury liability coverage per person: $25,000
  • Bodily injury liability coverage per accident: $50,000
  • Property damage liability coverage: $10,000
  • Personal injury protection: Optional
  • Uninsured/underinsured motorist coverage: Optional

New York

  • Bodily injury liability coverage per person: $25,000
  • Bodily injury liability coverage per accident: $50,000
  • Property damage liability coverage: $10,000
  • Personal injury protection: $50,000 per person
  • Uninsured/underinsured motorist coverage: $25,000 per person; $50,000 per accident

Notes: New York also requires motorists carry wrongful death coverage, with minimum limits of $50,000 for one death per accident and $100,000 for multiple deaths per accident.

North Carolina

  • Bodily injury liability coverage per person: $30,000
  • Bodily injury liability coverage per accident: $60,000
  • Property damage liability coverage: $25,000
  • Personal injury protection: Optional
  • Uninsured/underinsured motorist coverage: Must match highest BI minimum ($60,000 per accident)

North Dakota

  • Bodily injury liability coverage per person: $25,000
  • Bodily injury liability coverage per accident: $50,000
  • Property damage liability coverage: $25,000
  • Personal injury protection: $30,000 maximum per person
  • Uninsured/underinsured motorist coverage: $25,000 per person; $50,000 per accident

Ohio

  • Bodily injury liability coverage per person: $25,000
  • Bodily injury liability coverage per accident: $50,000
  • Property damage liability coverage: $25,000
  • Personal injury protection: Optional
  • Uninsured/underinsured motorist coverage: Optional

Oklahoma

  • Bodily injury liability coverage per person: $25,000
  • Bodily injury liability coverage per accident: $50,000
  • Property damage liability coverage: $25,000
  • Personal injury protection: Optional
  • Uninsured/underinsured motorist coverage: Optional

Oregon

  • Bodily injury liability coverage per person: $25,000
  • Bodily injury liability coverage per accident: $50,000
  • Property damage liability coverage: $20,000
  • Personal injury protection: $15,000 per person
  • Uninsured/underinsured motorist coverage: Equal to the state’s liability minimums ($25,000 per person and $50,000 per accident)

Pennsylvania

  • Bodily injury liability coverage per person: $15,000
  • Bodily injury liability coverage per accident: $30,000
  • Property damage liability coverage: $5,000
  • Personal injury protection: $5,000 per person in medical benefit coverage
  • Uninsured/underinsured motorist coverage: Optional

Rhode Island

  • Bodily injury liability coverage per person: $25,000
  • Bodily injury liability coverage per accident: $50,000
  • Property damage liability coverage: $25,000
  • Personal injury protection: Optional
  • Uninsured/underinsured motorist coverage: $25,000 per person and $50,000 per accident

Note: Uninsured motorist property damage coverage is optional in Rhode Island

South Carolina

  • Bodily injury liability coverage per person: $25,000
  • Bodily injury liability coverage per accident: $50,000
  • Property damage liability coverage: $25,000
  • Personal injury protection: Optional
  • Uninsured/underinsured motorist coverage: Coverage must equal liability limits ($25,000 per person and $50,000 per accident)

South Dakota

  • Bodily injury liability coverage per person: $25,000
  • Bodily injury liability coverage per accident: $50,000
  • Property damage liability coverage: $25,000
  • Personal injury protection: Optional
  • Uninsured/underinsured motorist coverage: $25,000 per person; $50,000 person incident

Tennessee

  • Bodily injury liability coverage per person: $25,000
  • Bodily injury liability coverage per accident: $50,000
  • Property damage liability coverage: $15,000
  • Personal injury protection: Optional
  • Uninsured/underinsured motorist coverage: Optional

Texas

  • Bodily injury liability coverage per person: $30,000
  • Bodily injury liability coverage per accident: $60,000
  • Property damage liability coverage: $25,000
  • Personal injury protection: Optional
  • Uninsured/underinsured motorist coverage: Optional

Utah

  • Bodily injury liability coverage per person: $25,000
  • Bodily injury liability coverage per accident: $65,000
  • Property damage liability coverage: $15,000
  • Personal injury protection: $3,000 per person
  • Uninsured/underinsured motorist coverage: Optional

Notes: Utah drivers can choose a single bodily injury + property damage coverage option of $80,000.

Vermont

  • Bodily injury liability coverage per person: $25,000
  • Bodily injury liability coverage per accident: $50,000
  • Property damage liability coverage: $10,000
  • Personal injury protection: Optional
  • Uninsured/underinsured motorist coverage: $50,000 per person; $100,000 per accident; and $10,000 PD

Virginia

  • Bodily injury liability coverage per person: $25,000
  • Bodily injury liability coverage per accident: $50,000
  • Property damage liability coverage: $20,000
  • Personal injury protection: Optional
  • Uninsured/underinsured motorist coverage: Coverage must match your liability limits, so $25,000 per person and $50,000 per incident

Notes: In lieu of car insurance, you can pay the Virginia DMV a fee of $500 to drive uninsured. This will not protect you financially, and if you cause a car accident, you are financially responsible for all bodily injuries and property damage that you cause.

Washington

  • Bodily injury liability coverage per person: $25,000
  • Bodily injury liability coverage per accident: $50,000
  • Property damage liability coverage: $10,000
  • Personal injury protection: Optional
  • Uninsured/underinsured motorist coverage: Optional

West Virginia

  • Bodily injury liability coverage per person: $25,000
  • Bodily injury liability coverage per accident: $50,000
  • Property damage liability coverage: $25,000
  • Personal injury protection: Optional
  • Uninsured/underinsured motorist coverage: Coverage must equal liability coverage ($25,000 per person and $50,000 per accident). But there’s also a state maximum of 100/300/50.

Wisconsin

  • Bodily injury liability coverage per person: $25,000
  • Bodily injury liability coverage per accident: $50,000
  • Property damage liability coverage: $10,000
  • Personal injury protection: Optional
  • Uninsured/underinsured motorist coverage: $25,000 per person; $50,000 per accident

Wyoming

  • Bodily injury liability coverage per person: $25,000
  • Bodily injury liability coverage per accident: $50,000
  • Property damage liability coverage: $20,000
  • Personal injury protection: Optional
  • Uninsured/underinsured motorist coverage: Optional

What happens if you get caught driving without your state’s required amount of insurance?

The consequences of driving under insured or driving uninsured vary from state to state. If you get pulled over, or get into a car accident, and you don’t have your state’s required amount of car insurance, there are a few things that could happen.

  • If you cause an accident and you’re underinsured, you could be stuck paying out of pocket for a lot of the damages or injuries
  • If you’re unable to pay for damage you caused, you may face wage garnishment
  • Fines or tickets, which could potentially cost hundreds or thousands of dollars
  • Driver’s license and vehicle registration suspension
  • Your car could be towed or impounded
  • Higher car insurance rates in the future

Information in this article is sourced from the Insurance Information Institute, individual state insurance and DMV offices.