Q

Does homeowners insurance cover pool liner repairs?

A

If your pool liner is damaged by a covered event, like a fire, hail, or storm damage, homeowners insurance may cover the cost of repairs. Wear and tear and maintenance issues are not covered.

Kara McGinley

By

Kara McGinley

Kara McGinley

Property and Casualty Insurance Expert

Kara McGinley is an insurance editor at Policygenius, specializing in home, auto, and renters insurance. She's been writing about insurance since 2019, and her work and insights have been referenced in Kiplinger and WRAL.com.

Published July 16, 2021|2 min read

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Homeowners insurance can help cover the cost of repairs to your pool liner if it’s damaged by a fallen tree, hail, or another event that is covered by your policy. 

However, homeowners insurance generally does not cover maintenance issues, so if your pool liner wears down over time or it’s bleached because of too much chlorine, your policy won’t cover repairs or a replacement liner.

Key Takeaways

  • Homeowners insurance can help cover the cost of pool liner repairs it’s damaged by a covered event. If a windstorm blows patio furniture into your pool and it tears the liner, repairs might be covered.

  • Homeowners insurance doesn’t cover regular maintenance issues, so if the liner leaks over time or it’s accidentally ripped during a pool party, repairs costs likely won’t be covered

  • Be sure to review your policy to see what types of pool-related damages are covered

Does homeowners insurance cover damage to pool liners?

Homeowners insurance may cover the cost of pool liner repairs if it is damaged by a covered peril in your policy. If a storm knocks a tree over into your pool and it tears the liner, you may be covered for repairs or a new liner.

Below are some common causes of pool liner damage that are covered by homeowners insurance:

  • Fire 

  • Lightning strikes

  • Windstorm and hail

  • Hurricanes

  • Falling objects, like a tree

  • Vandalism

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When does homeowners insurance not cover pool liner damage?

Pool liners are commonly torn or damaged due to general wear and tear and overexposure to UV rays, chlorine, and other pool-cleaning chemicals. But unfortunately, none of those things are covered by homeowners insurance. 

As a homeowner, it’s your responsibility to take care of the general upkeep of your property with routine maintenance checks. Pool liners generally last anywhere from 5 to 10 years, and you can help them last longer by consistently monitoring and maintaining the water and chemical levels of your pool.

Should I file a claim for a damaged pool liner? 

It depends. When you file a property damage claim, you have to pay a deductible, which is the out-of-pocket amount that you have to pay your insurer before your insurance kicks in. 

Filing a claim can raise your rates, so if the cost to repair your pool liner isn’t significantly more expensive than your deductible, it may be more cost-effective to just foot the bill yourself. If the repair costs are less than your policy deductible, then you won’t be able to file a claim. That means if the liner damage amounts to a few hundred dollars and you have a $1,000 deductible, you’ll have to pay for repairs out of pocket.

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