Q

What are the different types of permanent life insurance policies?

A

The four main types of permanent life insurance are whole life, universal life, variable life, and variable universal life.

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By

Rebecca Shoenthal

Rebecca Shoenthal

Licensed Insurance Expert

Rebecca Shoenthal is an insurance editor and licensed Life, Health, and Disability agent at Policygenius in New York City. Previously, she worked as a nonfiction book editor. She has a B.A. in Media and Journalism from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

Published July 22, 2021|3 min read

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Permanent life insurance is a type of lifelong coverage that does not expire like term life insurance. Permanent policies also have a cash value savings component that earns tax-deferred interest and can be accessed after holding the policy for a certain period of time. 

But there are several different types of permanent life insurance and the right policy for you depends on your current and future financial situation and coverage needs. The main difference between each type of policy is how the cash value grows. 

We’ll cover everything you need to know about the four most common types of permanent life insurance – whole, universal, variable, variable universal – so you can decide which policy you need.

Key Takeaways

  • Permanent life insurance lasts for your entire life and never expires

  • Most permanent policies come with a cash value component, but the type of policy determines how the money grows over time

  • Whole life, universal life, variable life, and variable universal life (VUL) are the four most common types of permanent life insurance 

Whole life insurance

Whole life insurance is the most popular type of permanent life insurance. Cash value accrues interest over time and can be accessed while you’re alive (though sometimes a penalty applies).

The cash value for whole life insurance policies grows at a modest rate, has a guaranteed minimum (or “floor”), and level premiums throughout the life of the policy, meaning the risk for the cash value is minimal.

Whole life insurance features:

  • Premiums: level

  • Death benefit: level; guaranteed minimum

  • Cash value: guaranteed

  • Growth: predetermined interest rate set by insurer

Universal life insurance

Universal life insurance is more flexible than whole life because you can make changes to both your premium and death benefit. The rate of growth for your cash value, however, is subject to change and is based on an interest rate set by the insurance company (whereas it’s fixed with a whole life policy). There is still a guaranteed death benefit.

Universal life insurance features:

  • Premiums: flexible

  • Death benefit: adjustable; guaranteed minimum

  • Cash value: guaranteed minimum

  • Growth: based on market index performance, such as the S&P 500

Variable life insurance

Variable life insurance has a cash value that grows based on investments in mutual funds offered by your life insurance company. The growth of the cash account correlates to broader market trends, so it’s possible to see faster increases than you’d see with other types of permanent life insurance. 

There is no guaranteed minimum cash value, so if the market fluctuates for the worse, you’d bear the investment risk. The death benefit for variable life insurance can fluctuate over time, but still has a guaranteed minimum amount.

Variable life insurance features:

  • Premiums: level

  • Death benefit: variable; guaranteed minimum

  • Cash value: not guaranteed

  • Growth: subaccounts (pool of investment funds offered by insurer)

Variable universal life insurance

Variable universal life insurance (VUL) combines universal and variable policy features: Your cash value is invested in a fund of your choosing and your premium and death benefit can fluctuate. It is similar to universal life insurance in that it has flexible premiums, but differs in its asset options. With a variable universal life insurance policy, you can choose the assets you invest your premiums in and there is no guaranteed minimum death benefit or guaranteed cash value.

Variable universal life insurance features:

  • Premiums: flexible

  • Death benefit: variable & adjustable; no guaranteed minimum

  • Cash value: not guaranteed

  • Growth: policyholder chooses assets, similar to an investment account

Final expense life insurance

A less common type of permanent life insurance that does not have a cash value like the others is final expense insurance. This category includes simplified issue and guaranteed issue insurance. These types of permanent life insurance are intended to cover end-of-life expenses or for those who don’t qualify for traditional coverage. Final expense policies only offer low death benefit amounts, up to $50,000.

Still not sure which type of permanent life insurance is best suited for your needs? Reach out to a Policygenius agent for free to compare policies and prices across multiple insurers

Frequently asked questions

What are the four types of permanent life insurance?

Whole, universal, variable, and variable universal are the four most common types of permanent life insurance.

What is the best type of permanent life insurance?

Whole life insurance has a cash value that is the least complicated, which makes it a good option for most people looking for permanent insurance. But depending on your retirement, estate planning, or future planning needs, other types of permanent insurance may be better for you.

What’s the difference between permanent and term life insurance?

Term life insurance expires after a set period of time (the term) and does not include a cash value component. Permanent life insurance lasts your entire life and most policies have cash value you can use while you’re alive. 

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