Best flood insurance companies of 2022

Neptune, Wright, Allstate, Kin, Chubb, and Palomar earned the top spots in our ranking of the best flood insurance companies for 2022.

Pat Howard 1600

By

Pat Howard

Pat Howard

Managing Editor & Licensed Home Insurance Expert

Pat Howard is a managing editor and licensed home insurance expert at Policygenius, where he specializes in homeowners insurance. His work and expertise has been featured in MarketWatch, Real Simple, Fox Business, VentureBeat, This Old House, Investopedia, Fatherly, Lifehacker, Better Homes & Garden, Property Casualty 360, and elsewhere.

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A typical homeowners insurance policy won’t cover flood damage to your home or personal belongings, which makes flood insurance a necessity for anyone who lives in a high-risk area. As climate change continues to increase the frequency and severity of flood events, it’s important to consider which companies offer the best flood insurance in the here and now.  

To find the 6 best flood insurance companies of 2022, we looked at company pricing data from the National Association of Insurance Commissioners (NAIC), financial strength ratings, policy options, coverage availability, as well as customer experience and availability of online resources. [1] [2] From there, we tailored our picks for a variety of different coverage considerations and needs.  

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The 6 best flood insurance companies of 2022 

Click on the company links to jump down to learn about why they made our list of the best flood insurance companies in 2022. 

Methodology

How we picked the best flood insurance companies & why you can trust us

To find and rank the best flood insurance companies of 2022, Policygenius analyzed 17 companies across several different categories. We considered each company’s average flood insurance premium, financial strength ratings with AM Best and Demotech, policy options and state availability, customer experience, product transparency, and the quality and availability of online resources.

Compare the best flood insurance companies of 2022

While Neptune is our pick for best overall flood insurance due to its robust coverage, affordable rates, and availability in nearly every state, Wright offers the cheapest flood insurance of any of the major companies we looked at thanks to the large mix of carriers and policy options it offers. 

Here’s a look at each company’s average annual flood insurance rate, AM Best rating, and waiting period until policies take effect.

Company

Average annual cost

AM Best rating

Waiting period

Neptune

$749

A (Excellent)

10 days

Wright

$470

A- (Excellent)

None

Allstate

$738*

A+ (Superior)

30 days

Kin

$196**

A+ (Superior)

None

Chubb

$2,698

A+ (Superior)

10 days

Palomar

$740

A- (Excellent)

None

*Based on a policy through the National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP) with $250,000 in building coverage and $100,000 in contents coverage. Your own rate with the NFIP will be the same regardless of whether you choose Allstate or another company that sells NFIP flood insurance. **Based on the cost of a flood coverage endorsement with Kin, which is a home insurance add-on that extends your coverage to flood damage.

Neptune: Best overall

Neptune

Neptune logo

Best overall company

Avg. flood insurance premium

$749/year

Neptune is a relative newcomer in the private flood insurance marketplace, but it has wasted no time becoming a major player thanks to its innovative underwriting capabilities and flexible coverage options.

Neptune flood insurance overview

  • Policy options: Private primary flood insurance

  • AM Best rating: A (Excellent)

  • Waiting period: 10 days (unless for a mortgage)

  • Elevation certificate: Not required

  • Availability: 48 states and Washington, D.C.

  • How to get a quote: Online through Policygenius or Neptune

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Why Neptune has the best flood insurance overall

Neptune’s private flood insurance option is likely the most comprehensive in our analysis, providing building coverage up to $4 million, high coverage limits for structures not attached to your home, and up to $10,000 in coverage for belongings stored in your basement — a rarity in flood insurance. That, along with availability in all but two states and relatively affordable premiums make Neptune the best overall flood insurance company in our analysis.

Neptune coverage details & availability

Neptune flood insurance coverage

Below are some of the highlights of Neptune’s main policy option:

Max building coverage: $4,000,000
Max contents coverage: $500,000
Additional structures: Up to $50,000
Temporary living expenses: Up to $10,000
Basement contents: Up to $10,000
Deductible options: $1,000 to $25,000

Neptune state availability

Neptune flood insurance policies are available in the following 48 states and the District of Columbia.

Alabama, Arkansas, Arizona, California, Colorado, Connecticut, Delaware, Florida, Georgia, Hawaii, Iowa, Idaho, Illinois, Indiana, Kansas, Kentucky, Louisiana, Massachusetts, Maryland, Maine, Michigan, Minnesota, Missouri, Mississippi, Montana, North Carolina, North Dakota, Nebraska, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New Mexico, Nevada, New York, Ohio, Oklahoma, Oregon, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, South Carolina, South Dakota, Tennessee, Texas, Utah, Virginia, Vermont, Washington, Wisconsin, West Virginia, Wyoming

Wright: Best for affordable rates

Wright

Wright logo

Best for affordable rates

Avg. flood insurance premium

$470/year

Wright Flood is one of the largest providers of flood insurance in the U.S, providing both NFIP and affordable private flood insurance options through Wright National Flood Insurance Services and its partnering companies.

Wright flood insurance overview

  • Policy options: Private primary, excess, and NFIP flood insurance

  • AM Best rating: A- (Excellent)

  • Availability: Up to 40 states, but varies by policy type

  • Waiting period: 0 to 30 days depending on the policy type

  • Elevation certificate: Not required for non-NFIP policies

  • How to get a quote: Online through Wright or by calling a Wright agent

Get quotes

Why Wright has the best cheap flood insurance

With an average annual flood insurance premium of $470 per year, Wright offers the best cheap flood insurance of any company in our analysis. Wright’s affordable flood insurance options are mainly due to the plethora of policy options and carrier mix it offers in the ~42 states it services.

Depending on your state, you may have the option of Wright’s own proprietary flood insurance product (ResiFlood), its excess flood insurance, or standalone coverage through partnering insurers Hiscox and Chubb. While it may not always be clear who to contact in the event of a policy question or claim, one thing is clear: Wright will consistently find you the lowest rates on flood insurance.

Wright coverage details & availability

Wright flood insurance coverage

Below are the coverage details of four of Wright’s policy options: ResiFlood, its own residential flood insurance policy; Hiscox and Chubb, two partnering companies who offer high-value and NFIP-equivalent flood insurance through Wright, respectively; and Wright Flood, which provides excess flood insurance to supplement NFIP flood insurance policies.

ResiFloodHiscoxChubbWright Flood
Policy typePrimaryPrimaryPrimaryExcess
Building coverageMax of $1,000,000Max of $1,250,000Max of $250,000Max of $1,750,000
Contents coverage50% of building coverage, max $250,000Max of $875,000Max of $100,000Max of $100,000
Additional structures10% of building coverage, max of $50,00010% of building coverageNot availableNot available
Loss of use20% of building coverage, max of $50,00020% of building coverageUp to $5,000 of additional coverage (where available)Not available
Deductible options$1,000 to $20,000$1,000 to $25,000$1,000 to $10,000Not available
Other detailsNo EC or waiting period, replacement cost settlements7 day waiting period unless for a mortgage, no EC required10 day waiting period unless for a mortgage, NFIP coverage formsExcess coverage for NFIP policies, no EC required, 30 day waiting period
Wright state availability

Wright standalone and excess flood insurance policies are available in the following 40 states.

Alabama, Arizona, Arkansas, California, Colorado, Connecticut, Delaware, Florida, Georgia, Hawaii, Idaho, Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Louisiana, Maine, Maryland, Massachusetts, Michigan, Mississippi, Montana, Nebraska, Nevada, New Jersey, New Mexico, New York, North Carolina, North Dakota, Ohio, Oklahoma, Oregon, Pennsylvania, , Rhode Island, South Carolina, Tennessee, Texas, Utah, Vermont, Virginia, Wisconsin

Allstate: Best option for NFIP coverage

Allstate

Allstate logo

Best option for NFIP coverage

Avg. flood insurance premium

$738/year

Allstate is our top pick for National Flood Insurance (NFIP) policy management due to its extensive network of agents, excellent educational resources and online policy management, and other flood insurance options through National General, its subsidiary.

Allstate flood insurance overview

  • Policy options: NFIP flood insurance

  • AM Best rating: A+ (Superior)

  • Availability: All 50 states and Washington, D.C.

  • Waiting period: 30 days 

  • Elevation certificate: Required in high-risk flood zones

  • How to get a quote: Online through Policygenius or Allstate

Get quotes

Why Allstate is the best company for NFIP flood insurance

Allstate is the top-rated company in our study of the best homeowners insurance companies in 2022 in large part due to its high customer satisfaction ratings. So when you get NFIP flood insurance through Allstate, you can expect the same level of personalized service and claims handling. 

Allstate coverage details & availability

Allstate flood insurance coverage

If you live in a community that participates in the National Flood Insurance Program, you may be able to purchase a policy with Allstate or any other private company that participates in the NFIP’s Write-Your-Own (WYO) program.

Here’s a brief overview of the coverages and limits included in an NFIP flood insurance policy.

Max building coverage: $250,000
Max contents coverage: $100,000
Additional structures: Up to 10% of building coverage (for detached garages only)
Temporary living expenses: Not available with the NFIP
Basement contents: Not covered
Deductible options: $1,000 to $10,000 (separate building & contents deductibles)

Allstate state availability

Allstate flood insurance through the NFIP is available in 50 states and the District of Columbia.

Kin: Best Florida flood insurance

Kin

Kin logo

Best Florida flood insurance

Avg. flood insurance premium

$196/year

Founded in 2016, Kin may lack industry experience and reputation, but this company knows what it’s doing. Florida and Louisiana homeowners can purchase Kin flood insurance as a home insurance add-on — all while saving both time and money.

Kin flood insurance overview

  • Policy options: Offered as add-on to homeowners insurance policy

  • AM Best rating: A (Excellent)

  • Availability: Florida and Louisiana

  • Waiting period: None 

  • Elevation certificate: Not required

  • How to get a quote: Online through Kin

Get quotes

Why Kin is the best company for Florida flood insurance

If you live in the Sunshine State and you’re in search of affordable flood and home insurance all rolled into one, look no further than Kin. Kin utilizes advanced underwriting and risk modeling technology to ensure your rates are based on your home’s individual risk, compared to the NFIP and competitor companies with less precise methods of assessing and rating risk. This is all to say that with Kin, Florida homeowners will never pay more than they absolutely should for flood insurance. 

Kin coverage details & availability

Kin flood insurance coverage

Below are some of the highlights of Kin flood insurance, which it adds as an endorsement to your homeowners insurance policy.

Max building coverage: Equal to dwelling coverage limit
Max contents coverage: Equal to personal property coverage limit
Additional structures: Equal to other structures coverage limit
Temporary living expenses: Equal to loss of use coverage limit
Basement contents: Not covered
Deductible options: Home insurance deductible applies to flood loss

Kin state availability

Kin flood insurance coverage endorsements are available in Florida and Louisiana.

Chubb: Best for high-value homes

Chubb

Chubb logo

Best for high-value homes

Avg. flood insurance premium

$2,698/year

Chubb is the industry leader at providing robust and customizable flood insurance for expensive homes thanks to its excellent financial strength and over 100 years of experience tailoring policies to suit the needs of its high net-worth clientele.

Chubb flood insurance overview

  • Policy options: Private primary and excess flood insurance

  • AM Best rating: A+ (Superior)

  • Availability: 41 states and Washington, D.C.

  • Waiting period: 10 days (unless for a mortgage)

  • Elevation certificate: Not required

  • How to get a quote: Online through Policygenius or by calling Chubb

Get quotes

Why Chubb is the best flood insurance option for high-value homes

Chubb’s high-value flood insurance policy includes up to $15 million in coverage for your home and belongings, coverage for additional structures and additional living expenses, and up to $15,000 in coverage for belongings stored in your basement. If your home is valued at more than $1 million and you have other property insurance needs, look no further than Chubb.

Chubb coverage details & availability

Chubb flood insurance coverage

Below are some of the highlights of Chubb’s high-value flood insurance policy.

Max building coverage: $15,000,000 per location (building and contents)
Additional structures: 10% of total property limit
Temporary living expenses: Up to $7,500, but optional higher limits may be available
Basement contents: Up to $15,000
Deductible options: $1,000 to $10,000

Chubb state availability

Chubb flood insurance policies are available in the following 41 states and the District of Columbia.

Alaska, Alabama, Arkansas, Arizona, California, Colorado, Connecticut, Delaware, Florida, Georgia, Hawaii, Iowa, Idaho, Illinois, Indiana, Kansas, Kentucky, Louisiana, Massachusetts, Maryland, Maine, Michigan, Minnesota, Missouri, Mississippi, Montana, North Carolina, North Dakota, Nebraska, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New Mexico, Nevada, New York, Ohio, Oklahoma, Oregon, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, South Carolina, South Dakota, Tennessee, Texas, Utah, Virginia, Vermont, Washington, Wisconsin, West Virginia, Wyoming

Palomar: Best for excess flood insurance

Palomar

Palomar logo

Best for excess flood insurance

Avg. flood insurance premium

$740/year

With its high available coverage limits and willingness to cover homes in any flood zone, Palomar has the best and most affordable excess flood insurance for those with NFIP policies who are in need of additional coverage.

Palomar flood insurance overview

  • Policy options: Excess flood insurance

  • AM Best rating: A- (Excellent)

  • Waiting period: None

  • Elevation certificate: Not required

  • Availability: 18 states

  • How to get a quote: Online through Policygenius or Palomar

Get quotes

Why Palomar is the best option for excess flood insurance

Palomar is one of the industry leaders in specialty and excess flood insurance coverage, writing both admitted and non-admitted flood insurance policies in 18 states. Homeowners who need an extra bit of coverage in addition to their NFIP flood insurance can get up to $5 million in buildings coverage, $1 million in personal property coverage, and temporary living expenses coverage of up to $50,000.

Palomar coverage details & availability

Palomar flood insurance coverage

Below are some of the highlights of Palomar’s excess flood insurance policy.

Max building coverage: $5,000,000
Max contents coverage: $1,000,000
Additional structures: 10% of building coverage limit
Temporary living expenses: Up to $50,000
Basement contents: Not covered
Deductible options: Fixed deductibles as low as low as $500

Palomar state availability

Palomar excess and standalone flood insurance policies are available in the following 18 states.

Arizona, California, Colorado, Hawaii, Illinois, Indiana, Maine, New Mexico, Nevada, Oklahoma, Oregon, Pennsylvania, South Carolina, Tennessee, Utah, Virginia, Washington, Wisconsin

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Flood insurance guide

In this section, we go over what flood insurance is, when homeowners need it, how to choose the best flood insurance for your home, and the average cost of flood insurance in each state for both NFIP and private flood policies. 

Scroll down or click on the links to jump further down the page.

What is flood insurance?

Flood insurance pays for damage to your home and personal belongings in the event they’re damaged during a natural flood event. 

A typical homeowners insurance policy covers certain types of water damage and flooding that originates inside your home — like a plumbing accident or wind-driven rain during a storm — but it won’t cover water damage due to heavy rain, hurricane flooding, high tides, or any other causes of natural flooding. 

A good rule of thumb is if the water flows in from outside, it’s likely not covered under your homeowners insurance policy. 

The extent and quality of flood insurance coverage can vary substantially depending on where your home is located, the type of policy you’re covered under, and other factors. 

Policies purchased through the National Flood Insurance Program generally cover your home’s structure, your belongings, and home systems and appliances, but coverage is limited for property located in basements; and there are other restrictions that can impact your reimbursement amount after a flood loss.

While it’s estimated that over 90% of flood insurance policies are provided by the NFIP, private flood insurance has become an increasingly popular alternative to the federal plan thanks to its more customizable policy options and favorable pricing for homes with minimal flood risk. [3]   In 2021 alone, some states — including Texas, New Jersey, and Oklahoma — saw their total number of in-force private flood insurance policies increase by around 100% versus 2020. 

Who needs flood insurance?

While flood insurance is not required by law, you may be required to purchase coverage if you have a federally regulated mortgage and your home is in a FEMA-designated floodplain. 

If the following apply to your house or mortgage, you’ll likely need to purchase flood insurance.

  • Your home is located in a high-risk flood zone according to FEMA flood maps. If your house is in a zone that starts with an A or V, that means you’re in a FEMA floodplain.  

  • You have a federally regulated mortgage with the FHA or VA, or your loan is backed by Fannie Mae or Freddie Mac.

  • You live in one of the 22,000 NFIP-participating communities.

But even if your mortgage lender doesn’t require this coverage or your house doesn’t have much perceived risk, flood insurance is still a good idea. 

Is private flood insurance better than the NFIP?

While the NFIP is federally backed and available almost everywhere in the U.S, there’s a strict limit to how much coverage you can purchase, and policies come with several restrictions around what the coverage actually pays for. Private flood insurance is less widely available than the NFIP option, but policies are more comprehensive and can often be customized to suit your specific coverage needs. 

While NFIP flood insurance is sold by more than 50 private insurers that participate in its Write-Your-Own program — including companies like Allstate, GEICO, and Farmers — the NFIP underwrites the policies and determines rates, so your coverage and rates will be the same regardless of which company sells you the policy. The insurance company is responsible for servicing the policy and managing claims, so if you’re considering NFIP coverage, you’ll want to choose a company that has stellar claims satisfaction reviews.

On the other hand, private flood insurance policies generally allow for higher building coverage limits, more robust coverages, shorter waiting periods until your policy takes effect, and can often cost less depending on where you live. 

Here’s a look at what you can expect with private flood insurance compared to the NFIP policy.

National Flood Insurance Program

Private flood insurance

Building property coverage

Max of $250,000

Up to $15,000,000 depending on the company

Personal property coverage

Max of $100,000

Up to $1,000,000 depending on the company

Additional living expenses

Not included

Often included

Basement contents

Limited to wall fixtures, air conditioners, washer/dryers

Often covered

Deductible

$1,000 to $10,000

$1,000 to $50,000

Waiting period

30 days

As little as 0 to 10 days

Accepted by mortgages

Yes

Yes

Availability

56 states and jurisdictions

May be limited in higher-risk areas

Learn more >> NFIP vs. private flood insurance: Which is better?

UPDATE: NFIP set to expire on September 30, 2022 — here's what you need to know

Unless reauthorized by Congress, the National Flood Insurance Program will expire at midnight on September 30, 2022.

In the event of an NFIP lapse, existing flood insurance policies would still remain active until their expiration date, and FEMA would still be obligated to pay out claims with its remaining funds.

However, there are several limitations that will be imposed on the NFIP if it isn't extended, including:

  • The NFIP won't be able to provide new flood insurance policies or renew contracts that expire.

  • The NFIP's authority to borrow funds from the Treasury will be reduced from $30.425 billion to $1 billion.

  • The federal requirement to purchase flood insurance will be suspended. That means mortgage lender will have to decide whether or not to extend loans to borrowers in high-risk flood zones while the NFIP is in limbo.

With the uncertainty surrounding the NFIP, homeowners in need of flood insurance may want to consider private flood insurance that's provided and backed by private insurance companies. To find out more about private flood insurance options in your state, contact your state's department of insurance.

We'll update this page as more news becomes available.

How much does flood insurance cost?

The average annual cost of flood insurance through the NFIP is $738, while private flood insurance costs around $1,074 per year, according to our 2022 analysis of flood insurance pricing data from the NAIC and FEMA. [4] [5]

But keep in mind that the NFIP and private flood insurers have completely different methods for underwriting and rating certain property types and evaluating risk. So your own rates may vary substantially depending on factors like your home's elevation, flood zone, and how much coverage you need.

Compare NFIP & private flood insurance rates in your state

Here is a state-by-state breakdown of how much private flood insurance costs on average each year compared to that of an NFIP policy.

States

Average private flood premium

Average NFIP premium

% difference for private flood

Alabama

$821

$782

4.9%

Alaska

$1,281

$766

67.2%

Arizona

$505

$680

-25.7%

Arkansas

$573

$721

-20.5%

California

$850

$707

20.2%

Colorado

$909

$805

12.9%

Connecticut

$1,515

$1,198

26.5%

Delaware

$1,364

$939

45.3%

District of Columbia

$475

$686

-30.7%

Florida

$1,439

$785

83.3%

Georgia

$1,066

$699

52.6%

Hawaii

$1,945

$1,033

88.3%

Idaho

$1,030

$731

40.9%

Illinois

$683

$729

-6.3%

Indiana

$853

$691

23.4%

Iowa

$653

$752

-13.2%

Kansas

$583

$736

-20.7%

Kentucky

$690

$796

-13.3%

Louisiana

$1,222

$656

86.2%

Maine

$1,356

$1,065

27.3%

Maryland

$770

$755

1.9%

Massachusetts

$1,454

$883

64.6%

Michigan

$787

$753

4.6%

Minnesota

$689

$722

-4.5%

Mississippi

$731

$773

-5.5%

Missouri

$606

$746

-18.7%

Montana

$870

$821

6.0%

Nebraska

$799

$815

-2.0%

Nevada

$517

$767

-32.6%

New Hampshire

$1,232

$937

31.5%

New Jersey

$1,159

$749

54.8%

New Mexico

$654

$974

-32.8%

New York

$1,420

$725

95.8%

North Carolina

$888

$769

15.4%

North Dakota

$589

$699

-15.7%

Ohio

$704

$732

-3.9%

Oklahoma

$639

$646

-1.0%

Oregon

$751

$745

0.8%

Pennsylvania

$934

$766

21.9%

Rhode Island

$1,538

$1,001

53.6%

South Carolina

$1,126

$738

52.5%

South Dakota

$693

$745

-7.0%

Tennessee

$632

$693

-8.8%

Texas

$730

$643

13.5%

Utah

$501

$667

-24.8%

Vermont

$1,568

$731

114.6%

Virginia

$885

$815

8.6%

Washington

$842

$733

14.9%

West Virginia

$819

$721

13.6%

Wisconsin

$753

$737

2.1%

Wyoming

$1,221

$799

52.8%

Our private flood insurance average was based on 2021 data for “first dollar” policies, or primary flood insurance policies — excess flood insurance data was not included in this analysis. To calculate the average annual premium in each state for both private and NAIC flood insurance policies, we divided the total written premium by the number of in-force policies.

Find the average cost of flood insurance in your state in 2022

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How to choose the best flood insurance

Not all flood insurance companies or policy options are created equal. Follow these steps to compare your options and choose a policy that suits your coverage needs at the most affordable rate.

1. Determine your coverage needs

To figure out how much flood insurance coverage you need, you’ll want to get an estimate of:

  • The replacement cost of your home: This is the amount it would cost to rebuild your home from the ground up. Replacement cost is based on factors like your home’s square footage, build, and other factors like labor and construction costs in your area.

  • The value of your personal belongings: You’ll want enough personal property coverage to cover the value of your belongings inside the home, including furniture, electronics, and appliances. 

If your mortgage lender requires flood insurance, they’ll likely indicate how much you need to purchase. In most cases, you’ll need at least enough to cover the value of the mortgage. But depending on factors like your home’s location, elevation, and how much coverage you need, you may want to consider more than just the minimum coverage amounts required by your lender. 

2. See what options are available in your area

When looking for flood insurance in your area, you’ll likely need to decide between NFIP and private flood insurance. But there are a few particular types of private flood insurance that you should be aware of:

  • Standalone flood insurance: This a full flood insurance policy (similar to a standard home insurance policy) that often allows for higher coverage limits for your home and belongings and more extensive coverage options than an NFIP policy.  

  • Excess flood insurance: Excess flood policies are purchased in addition to an NFIP policy to provide higher coverage limits for your home and belongings in the event a flood loss exceeds your NFIP coverage limits. 

  • Flood insurance endorsement: A flood insurance endorsement is a home insurance coverage add-on that can be added to your policy for a relatively low additional premium. Though keep in mind that flood endorsements may not provide as much protection as a full standalone policy.

3. Shop around and compare quotes 

Once you know your flood insurance options, be sure to compare flood insurance quotes from at least three companies through a marketplace like Policygenius. 

With Policygenius, you can compare private flood insurance rates from multiple companies, including Neptune, Orchid, and Palomar, as well as NFIP rates through larger companies we offer like Allstate and Progressive.

4. Check for discounts

Once you’ve compared quotes and selected a policy, ask your insurance agent if there are any available discounts that you may be eligible for or ways to lower your policy premium. Here are a few of the most common ways to save on flood insurance:

  • Community-wide discounts: NFIP policyholders who live in communities enrolled in the NFIP’s Community Rating System (CRS) are eligible for flood insurance discounts of up to 45%, according to FEMA. See if you live in one of the 1,520 CRS communities in the U.S.

  • Elevation certificate discounts: An elevation certificate (EC) provides evidence of your home’s elevation relative to your area’s base flood elevation, which is the maximum height floodwaters can rise to during a flood event. If you recently mitigated your home’s flood risk by elevating your house or filling in your basement, an EC can provide the proof you need to get discounts on flood insurance.

  • Increase your flood deductible: Your flood insurance deductible is the amount you’re responsible for paying on each claim before your insurance kicks in. A high policy deductible means lower flood insurance rates, but it also means you’ll be paying more out of pocket in the event of a claim. 

Once your first flood insurance payment is made, you may have a waiting period before your policy goes into effect. For NFIP flood insurance, the waiting period is around 30 days; for private flood insurance, waiting periods are anywhere from 0 to 10 days depending on whether or not you’re purchasing coverage as a requirement of your mortgage or not.

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Frequently asked questions

Which company has the cheapest flood insurance?

According to our analysis of private flood insurance rates, Wright Flood, Bankers Insurance, and Kin have the cheapest flood insurance rates of any company in 2022.

What is the highest deductible for flood insurance?

The highest deductible available through the NFIP is $10,000, while some private flood insurace providers offer deductibles as high as $50,000.

Can you shop around for flood insurance?

If you're considering flood insurance, it's important to shop and compare quotes from multiple companies to ensure you're getting the best flood insurance coverage at the best rate.

References

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Policygenius uses external sources, including government data, industry studies, and reputable news organizations to supplement proprietary marketplace data and internal expertise. Learn more about how we use and vet external sources as part of our

editorial standards.
  1. National Association of Insurance Commissioners

    . "

    Private Flood Insurance Data Collection

    ." Accessed September 19, 2022.

  2. AM Best

    . "

    AM Best

    ." Accessed September 19, 2022.

  3. University of Pennsylvania Wharton School of Risk Management

    . "

    An Overview of the National Flood Insurance Program in Washington, DC

    ." Accessed September 19, 2022.

  4. Federal Emergency Management Agency

    . "

    Flood Insurance Data and Analytics

    ." Accessed September 21, 2022.

Author

Managing Editor & Licensed Home Insurance Expert

Pat Howard

Managing Editor & Licensed Home Insurance Expert

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Pat Howard is a managing editor and licensed home insurance expert at Policygenius, where he specializes in homeowners insurance. His work and expertise has been featured in MarketWatch, Real Simple, Fox Business, VentureBeat, This Old House, Investopedia, Fatherly, Lifehacker, Better Homes & Garden, Property Casualty 360, and elsewhere.

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