Does homeowners insurance cover dog bites?

Yes, homeowners insurance will cover the costs if your dog bites someone and injures them. But certain breeds, like pit bulls, may be difficult to insure or denied coverage altogether.

Stephanie Nieves author photoKara McGinley

By

Stephanie Nieves

Stephanie Nieves

Editor & Home and Auto Insurance Expert

Stephanie Nieves is a former editor and insurance expert at Policygenius, where she covered home and auto insurance. Her work has also appeared in Business Insider, Money, HerMoney, PayScale, and The Muse.

&Kara McGinley

Kara McGinley

Senior Editor & Licensed Home Insurance Expert

Kara McGinley is a senior editor and licensed home insurance expert at Policygenius, where she writes about homeowners and renters insurance. As a journalist and as an insurance expert, her work and insights have been featured in Kiplinger, Lifehacker, MSN, WRAL.com, and elsewhere.

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More than 4.5 million people are bitten by dogs each year in the U.S., according to the American Veterinary Medical Association. [1] In most cases, homeowners insurance will pay for medical expenses and legal fees if your dog bites someone. However, certain breeds are categorized as “dangerous” and are either difficult to insure or excluded from coverage altogether. You also may be denied coverage if your dog has a history of aggressive behavior. 

Key takeaways

  • Homeowners insurance typically covers dog bites up to the limits spelled out in the dog owner’s policy.

  • Certain dog breeds, like pit bulls, rottweilers, and chow chows, may be categorized as “dangerous” and excluded from coverage altogether.

  • If a dog bite claim exceeds the personal liability or medical payments coverage limits in your policy, you as the dog owner will be responsible for the remaining expenses.

How does homeowners insurance cover dog bites?

As long as your dog isn’t an excluded breed, your home insurance will likely cover you if your dog bites someone.

Here’s how it works.

  • The personal liability component of your homeowners insurance covers damage and injury you’re responsible for. So if your pup bites someone, your liability coverage can cover their medical expenses or any legal fees. Most insurance companies offer between $100,000 and $500,000 in personal liability coverage. 

  • The medical payments coverage in your policy covers more minor medical fees of your guests — regardless of who is at fault.You can typically get between $1,000 and $5,000 in medical payments coverage.

An umbrella policy offers more liability coverage

If you want more liability coverage than your policy offers, consider a personal umbrella policy. With umbrella insurance, you can extend your liability coverage in $1 million increments — typically up to $5 million. This may be a good idea if you have a more aggressive dog, or if you recently adopted one and are still learning its personality.

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When will homeowners insurance cover a dog bite?

Below are situations when homeowners insurance can help cover the costs associated with a dog bite

When your dog bites a guest

If your dog bites a guest in your home and they’re injured, your medical payments coverage can help pay for things like an ambulance and first aid. If the injury is severe, liability coverage can help pay for their more extensive medical bills. And if you and the guest have a dispute and they take you to court over the matter, your liability coverage can help pay for legal fees. 

When your dog bites someone away from your home

Homeowners insurance generally covers dog bites on and off your property, like if your dog bites someone at the park. However, you should check your policy to make sure it doesn't specifically limit your coverage to dog bites that happen on your premises.

When your dog damages someone else’s property 

If you take your dog to your friend’s house and your pup tears apart their new fancy sofa, liability coverage can help pay for the property damage. 

When won’t homeowners insurance cover dog bites?

Whether or not you’ll be covered if your dog bites someone largely depends on your insurance company. Below are some situations when you wouldn’t be covered for a dog bite. 

History of biting

Once your dog has bitten someone, it’s deemed high risk. This could lead to an increased homeowners insurance premium when it’s time to renew your policy or might exclude your dog from coverage. In the worst case scenario, your homeowner’s insurance policy could be rejected for renewal altogether.

Dangerous breeds

Certain breeds may also be excluded from some homeowners insurance policies if companies consider them higher risk. Below are some dog breeds that may be excluded from coverage.

  • Akitas

  • Alaskan Malamutes

  • Any wolf breeds

  • Chow chows

  • Doberman pinschers

  • German shepherds

  • Great Danes

  • Pit bulls

  • Presa Canarios

  • Rottweilers

  • Siberian huskies

  • Staffordshire terriers

Make sure to look out for caveats in your policy — some insurance companies might still include your dog in coverage if it’s completed a certain amount of training.

Some states ban dog breed discrimination

Dog advocacy groups are working on getting breed discrimination banned. Illinois, Nevada, and New York have all passed legislation that bans insurers from preventing coverage due to dog breed. 

If your dog bites you or a resident of your household

Liability coverage and medical expenses coverage does not protect you or residents of your home from injury. 

Does homeowners insurance cover dog bites to other dogs?

Yes, your homeowners insurance can cover the cost if your dog bites another dog and they need to go to the vet or the other owner decides to sue you. Check with your insurer to be sure they’ll cover vet bills and related costs if your dog injures another dog.

Consider pet liability insurance

If your dog is excluded from coverage for any reason or if your homeowners policy doesn’t cover dog bites at all, you can get pet liability insurance. This covers dogs of all breeds if they bite another person or animal. Your homeowners insurance company may offer it as an endorsement or a standalone pet liability policy, but you may also be able to buy a pet policy from a specialized liability insurer if they don’t.

Here are a few pet liability insurance companies you might want to check out:

  • Xinsurance

  • Prime Insurance Company

  • InsureMyK9

  • Einhorn Insurance Agency

8 tips for preventing dog bites

There are several steps you can take to get ahead of a potentially dangerous dog bite situation. Remember, if you’re struggling with your dog’s behavioral issues, it’s always a good idea to consult a vet or professional trainer. Here are a few tips to get started:

  • Socialize your dog early and often. Introducing your dog to other dogs, humans, and new situations early on can ease their hostility as they get older.

  • Visit the vet regularly. Make sure your dog is vaccinated and up to date on all shots; a sick dog may react more erratically than a healthy one.

  • Hire a professional. A professional dog trainer will know how to handle your dog and can teach you tips that work for your particular pup.

  • Walk your dog. Just like exercise and fresh air promote healthy minds and bodies for humans, they also promote healthy behaviors for your dog.

  • Keep your dog on a leash. Always keep your dog on a leash on walks or when out in public.

  • Don’t leave your dog unattended. You can get in all kinds of trouble if your dog bites someone and you weren’t there to witness it, so make sure your dog is attended to in open yards and public areas.

  • Know your dog. You know your dog best, including what stresses them out and what calms them down, so keep them away from their stressors and any potentially threatening environments.

  • Stay alert. Always be ready to act, especially when others are around or your dog starts displaying aggressive behavior.

References

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Policygenius uses external sources, including government data, industry studies, and reputable news organizations to supplement proprietary marketplace data and internal expertise. Learn more about how we use and vet external sources as part of our

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  1. American Veterinary Medical Association

    . "

    Dog bite prevention

    ." Accessed January 27, 2022.

Authors

Editor & Home and Auto Insurance Expert

Stephanie Nieves

Editor & Home and Auto Insurance Expert

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Stephanie Nieves is a former editor and insurance expert at Policygenius, where she covered home and auto insurance. Her work has also appeared in Business Insider, Money, HerMoney, PayScale, and The Muse.

Senior Editor & Licensed Home Insurance Expert

Kara McGinley

Senior Editor & Licensed Home Insurance Expert

gray linkedin icon link

Kara McGinley is a senior editor and licensed home insurance expert at Policygenius, where she writes about homeowners and renters insurance. As a journalist and as an insurance expert, her work and insights have been featured in Kiplinger, Lifehacker, MSN, WRAL.com, and elsewhere.

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