Money pro tips: A Q&A with insurance expert Beth Koscianski

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Money pro tips: A Q&A with insurance expert Beth Koscianski

Every week, we ask our personal finance experts at Policygenius (and beyond) for their money pro tips. They spend all day helping people with money, so we figured they could share the wealth (PUN INTENDED). Want a sneak peek? Sign up for the Easy Money newsletter to see their answers ahead of time. Plus, you'll get a weekly dose of financial advice.

This week's expert is Beth Koscianski, insurance expert for Policygenius.

Last thing you resisted buying: A pricey vacation.

How did you resist it? I took a hard look at my budget.

Last thing you splurged on: An Amtrak ticket to visit my parents (instead of taking the much cheaper bus).

Why’d you OK the splurge? It saved me a lot of time on this particular day.

Biggest money worry: Credit card debt.

What are you doing about it? I recently started a strict budgeting program.

Money thing you’re most proud of: Good credit score.

Best financial advice you ever got: Don’t ignore bills or financial issues! They don’t go away if you just ignore them. You’ve got to make a plan and tackle them head on.

#1 money tip: Have an emergency fund that covers at least two months of expenses

What would you do with a $1 million windfall? Buy a house! Then split the rest between investment and high yield savings accounts.

Debunk a money myth: It’s not “impolite” to talk about money with your friends. You’d be surprised how many great conversations can come from it.

How do you budget? I use You Need A Budget right now!

Money must-read: "The Financial Diet" — Approachable financial advice written by women.

Best money you ever spent: The difference in rent I pay every month for a place in New York City vs. in my hometown.

Worst money you ever spent: Equinox membership.

Credit or debit? Credit.

Most common question people ask you about money: Is it rude to ask for more money when I negotiate my salary?

What’s your answer for them? No. If you believe your skills are worth it, then you should always feel OK asking for more.

Image: Nastia Kobzarenko