Best personal finance journalists for 2022

These journalists are doing the essential work of explaining, investigating, and simplifying money.

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The opaque pricing of COVID-19 tests and medical services. The predatory advertising of many professional masters programs. A must-read column for the latest research, legislation, and headlines that affect our money. A deep investigation into the tax dodges of the super-rich. These are just a few examples of the personal finance journalism that we are most inspired by this year. We read personal finance journalism all day, every day, and these eight journalists are the ones we keep returning to again and again.

Our picks

Danielle Douglas-Gabriel

Washington Post

Standout article: “How college students and their schools fared in Biden’s $2 trillion plan”

Danielle Douglas-Gabriel covers higher education and funding for the Washington Post. Her reporting has been invaluable in our understanding of how and why higher education costs are rising in the U.S. — and what we can do about it.

Kelly Phillips Erb

Bloomberg 

Standout article:It’s November 2021: Do you know where your workers are?

Kelly Phillips Erb is a lawyer and journalist who focuses on tax law. A former Senior Editor at Forbes, she is now the Team Lead for Insights and Commentary at Bloomberg Tax and Accounting as well as the host of the Taxgirl Podcast. We admire her for her clear tax explainers, her prolific output (including her Twitter), and her devotion to helping us all get taxes right.

ProPublica reporters, including Jeff Ernsthausen, Paul Kiel, Ellis Simani, Robert Faturechi, Ken Ward, Jr., Justin Elliott, James Bandler, Patricia Callahan, Nadia Sussman, Mauricio Rodríguez Pons, and Joseph Singer

ProPublica

Standout article: “The secret IRS files: Inside the tax records of the .001%”

ProPublica, the nonprofit organization that publishes original investigative journalism in the public interest, is known for its activist journalism. Their 2021 report on how the ultra-rich avoid taxes was expansive in scope and explosive in effect; it has already led to calls for tax reform. It was also a massive team effort, and we tip our hats to the hardworking reporters who made it happen.

Sarah Kliff

New York Times

Standout article: “How to look up prices at your hospital, if they exist”

Sarah Kliff is as good as it gets when it comes to healthcare coverage in the U.S. She spent over a decade covering the battle over the Affordable Care Act, and her reporting on surprise medical bills at Vox was influential in legislation banning the practice.

Ron Lieber

New York Times 

Standout article: “Women may be better investors than men. Let me mansplain why”

Rob Lieber has been writing the “Your Money” column at the New York Times since 2008. In that time he’s always been a must-read for his explainers, analysis, and expertise in the personal finance space. His columns are fun and easy to read — and we always learn something new.

Anne Helen Petersen

Culture Study 

Standout article: “The master's trap"

Anne Helen Petersen is a former academic turned Buzzfeed journalist who now makes her living writing books and sending out the Culture Study newsletter. Petersen’s reporting on American culture often includes a financial angle, and much of her work explores how our financial systems impact peoples’ lives.

Richard Rubin

Wall Street Journal 

Standout article: Elon Musk’s tax bill on stock options fell along with Tesla’s share price”

Why we like him: Richard Rubin’s Twitter profile sums up what makes him a great journalist to follow: “There’s ALWAYS a tax angle.” Rubin writes about tax policy for the Wall Street Journal, and between his insightful articles and up-to-the-minute Twitter, he makes taxes — dare we say it — exciting.  

Claire Suddath

Bloomberg Businessweek 

Standout article: How child care became the most broken business in America” 

As a staff writer for Bloomberg Businessweek, Claire Suddath has written about everything from dating app marketing to Boy Scouts bankruptcy, but it’s her reporting on how systems hurt Americans that really stands out. Her features on America’s failing safety net and broken child care business get to the heart of systems that are keeping people from thriving financially.

Methodology

To determine the best personal finance journalists for 2022, we looked at the breadth of personal finance coverage in 2021 and chose the work we were most inspired by. We looked at the journalists keeping us up to date on the news that affects our money, the journalists providing particular insight into how we spend our money, and journalists digging deep into financial systems. We chose journalists who made complicated topics accessible, who uncovered truths about money and systems that were new, and who helped us understand money better.