Weekly Reads: Healthcare, Facebook, and Olive Garden

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Weekly Reads: Healthcare, Facebook, and Olive Garden

We’ve got three pretty long reads this week, asking the tough questions: What is Facebook’s role in the world? Does everyone deserve affordable healthcare? What are your deep thoughts on Olive Garden? So sit back, enjoy the changing fall weather, and get ready to dive into some of the biggest problems we’re facing today. No pressure.


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NY Magazine
Does Even Mark Zuckerberg Know What Facebook Is?

Facebook! You know, the place where you invite people to events, post pictures of your baby, and meddle in foreign elections. Okay, so, yeah, that last part is a problem. And it speaks to the issue that New York Magazine tries to dig into: what is Facebook? And what does it want to be, and who does Mark Zuckerberg want to be? Where does Facebook fit in when it transcends geography and borders? How did we get to a place where we have to worry about social media influencing who is and is not a world leader? What happens if Twitter becomes as powerful as Facebook (oh God, actually don’t think about that)? These are the types of questions NY Mag asks — and while there aren’t really any answers, maybe just asking the right questions is a good place to start.


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The New Yorker
Is Health Care a Right?

Is healthcare a right? What about trash pickup, or clean water? And just what is a “right” anyway? Maybe you’ve heard, but there’s a huge debate going on about what health insurance should be, and what we as a society are willing to deem “good enough” when it comes to making sure people have access to it. To some, those who work should get the reward of affordable care. To others, it seems wrong to leave people to fend for themselves. There are all sorts of things to consider on both sides, and maybe we should start thinking about them before yet another Republican healthcare bill is introduced.


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Eater
Christ in the Garden of Endless Breadsticks

Chain restaurants are easy targets for ridicule, but almost all of us have memories of going to a TGI Fridays or a Ruby Tuesdays or a Chilis with the family growing up. Olive Garden is unique (as unique as a casual chain restaurant can be) in that it tries really hard to evoke a certain feeling that’s both easy to pin down — Tuscany , Italy — and able to exist throughout small-town and big-city America. Maybe you weren’t expecting an expose about Olive Garden, comparing it to youthful memories and Gauguin’s Christ in the Garden of Olives, but this fantastic piece from Eater does just that. Whether this makes you crave toasted raviolis or gives you night terrors over unlimited soup, salad, and breadsticks, it’s worth a read.

Image: njpPhoto