How much auto insurance is required in all 50 states

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How much auto insurance is required in all 50 states

Almost every state has a car insurance requirement, but unfortunately for those looking for easy answers, each one of those states has a different minimum amount of insurance needed. Some require just liability insurance, some require insurance for uninsured motorists, and some require additional medical coverage.
Here's the good news: you only have to worry about the requirements in your state, so find your state's initials in the list below and click them to jump to your state's requirements.
(Need a crash course on auto insurance? Check out our article explaining how it works.)

Alabama

Alabama requires drivers have both bodily injury and property damage liability auto insurance. The minimum liability limits are 25/50/25 – $25,000 bodily injury limit for a single person, $50,000 bodily injury limit on the entire accident, and a $25,000 property damage limit.

Alaska

Alaska requires drivers to have both bodily injury (BI) and property damage (PD) liability auto insurance. The minimum liability limits are 50/100/25 – $50,000 bodily injury limit for a single person, $100,000 bodily injury limit on the entire accident, and a $25,000 property damage limit.

Arizona

Arizona requires drivers to have both bodily injury (BI) and property damage (PD) liability auto insurance. The minimum liability limits are 15/30/10 – $15,000 bodily injury limit for a single person, $30,000 bodily injury limit on the entire accident, and a $10,000 property damage limit.

Arkansas

Arkansas requires drivers to have both bodily injury (BI) and property damage (PD) liability auto insurance. The minimum liability limits are 25/50/25 – $25,000 bodily injury limit for a single person, $50,000 bodily injury limit on the entire accident, and a $25,000 property damage limit.
Arkansas also requires car insurance companies to provide a personal injury protection (PIP) policy with a minimum limit of $5,000. Drivers, however, can choose to reject this coverage.

California

California requires drivers to have both bodily injury (BI) and property damage (PD) liability auto insurance. The minimum liability limits are 15/30/5 – $15,000 bodily injury limit for a single person, $30,000 bodily injury limit on the entire accident, and a $5,000 property damage limit.
California also helps low-income drivers who otherwise would not qualify for auto insurance get a policy through the California Automobile Assigned Risk Plan. The minimum liability limits for one of these policies is 10/20/3.

Colorado

Colorado requires drivers to have both bodily injury (BI) and property damage (PD) liability auto insurance. The minimum liability limits are 25/40/15 – $25,000 bodily injury limit for a single person, $30,000 bodily injury limit on the entire accident, and a $15,000 property damage limit.

Connecticut

Connecticut requires drivers to have both bodily injury (BI) and property damage (PD) liability auto insurance. The minimum liability limits are 20/40/10 – $20,000 bodily injury limit for a single person, $40,000 bodily injury limit on the entire accident, and a $10,000 property damage limit.
Connecticut also requires drivers to have uninsured motorist (UM) and underinsured motorist (UIM) coverage. There is a minimum limit of $40,000 per accident for UM/UIM coverage.

Delaware

Delaware requires drivers to have both bodily injury (BI) and property damage (PD) liability auto insurance. The minimum liability limits are 15/30/10 – $15,000 bodily injury limit for a single person, $30,000 bodily injury limit on the entire accident, and a $10,000 property damage limit.
Delaware is a no-fault, meaning drivers can make a claim with their auto insurance company regardless of who caused the accident, and therefore also requires a personal injury protection (PIP) policy. The minimum limits for PIP policies purchased in Delaware are $15,000 per person and $30,000 per accident.

District of Columbia

The District of Columbia requires drivers to have both bodily injury (BI) and property damage (PD) liability auto insurance. The minimum liability limits are 25/50/10 – $25,000 bodily injury limit for a single person, $50,000 bodily injury limit on the entire accident, and a $10,000 property damage limit.
The District of Columbia also requires a personal injury protection (PIP) policy. The minimum limits for PIP policies purchased in the District of Columbia are $25,000 per person and $50,000 per accident.
The District of Columbia also requires uninsured motorist (UM) and underinsured motorist (UIM) coverage, with a minimum limit of $5,000 per accident.

Florida

Florida requires drivers to have property damage (PD) liability auto insurance with a minimum limit of $10,000 per accident.
Florida also requires personal injury protection (PIP) coverage with a minimum limit of $10,000 per accident.

Georgia

Georgia requires drivers to have both bodily injury (BI) and property damage (PD) liability auto insurance. The minimum liability limits are 25/50/25 – $25,000 bodily injury limit for a single person, $50,000 bodily injury limit on the entire accident, and a $25,000 property damage limit.

Hawaii

Hawaii requires drivers to have both bodily injury (BI) and property damage (PD) liability auto insurance. The minimum liability limits are 20/40/10 – $20,000 bodily injury limit for a single person, $40,000 bodily injury limit on the entire accident, and a $10,000 property damage limit.
Hawaii is a no-fault, and therefore also requires a personal injury protection (PIP) policy. The minimum limit for PIP policies purchased in Hawaii is $10,000 per accident.

Idaho

Idaho requires drivers to have both bodily injury (BI) and property damage (PD) liability auto insurance. The minimum liability limits are 25/50/15 – $25,000 bodily injury limit for a single person, $50,000 bodily injury limit on the entire accident, and a $15,000 property damage limit.

Illinois

Illinois requires drivers to have both bodily injury (BI) and property damage (PD) liability auto insurance. The minimum liability limits are 25/50/20 – $25,000 bodily injury limit for a single person, $50,000 bodily injury limit on the entire accident, and a $20,000 property damage limit.
Illinois also requires drivers to purchase uninsured motorist (UM) and underinsured motorist (UIM) coverage, with minimum limits of $20,000 per person and $40,000 per accident.

Indiana

Indiana requires drivers to have both bodily injury (BI) and property damage (PD) liability auto insurance. The minimum liability limits are 25/50/10 – $25,000 bodily injury limit for a single person, $50,000 bodily injury limit on the entire accident, and a $10,000 property damage limit.

Iowa

Iowa requires drivers to have both bodily injury (BI) and property damage (PD) liability auto insurance. The minimum liability limits are 20/40/15 – $20,000 bodily injury limit for a single person, $40,000 bodily injury limit on the entire accident, and a $15,000 property damage limit.

Kansas

Kansas requires drivers to have both bodily injury (BI) and property damage (PD) liability auto insurance. The minimum liability limits are 25/50/10 – $25,000 bodily injury limit for a single person, $50,000 bodily injury limit on the entire accident, and a $10,000 property damage limit.
Kansas is a no-fault, and therefore also requires a personal injury protection (PIP) policy. The minimum limit for PIP policies purchased in Kansas is $4,500 per accident.

Kentucky

Kentucky requires drivers to have both bodily injury (BI) and property damage (PD) liability auto insurance. The minimum liability limits are 25/50/10 – $25,000 bodily injury limit for a single person, $50,000 bodily injury limit on the entire accident, and a $10,000 property damage limit.
Kentucky is a no-fault, and therefore also requires a personal injury protection (PIP) policy. The minimum limit for PIP policies purchased in Kentucky is $10,000 per accident.

Louisiana

Louisiana requires drivers to have both bodily injury (BI) and property damage (PD) liability auto insurance. The minimum liability limits are 15/30/25 – $15,000 bodily injury limit for a single person, $30,000 bodily injury limit on the entire accident, and a $25,000 property damage limit.

Maine

Maine requires drivers to have both bodily injury (BI) and property damage (PD) liability auto insurance. The minimum liability limits are 50/100/25 – $50,000 bodily injury limit for a single person, $100,000 bodily injury limit on the entire accident, and a $25,000 property damage limit.
Drivers in Maine are also required to have medical payments coverage, a type of insurance similar to personal injury protection, but exclusively used to cover medical payments. The minimum limit is $2,000 per accident.
Maine also requires uninsured motorist (UM) coverage. Your UM coverage must match the liability limits you’ve chosen for your BI and PD liability coverage.

Maryland

Maryland requires drivers to have both bodily injury (BI) and property damage (PD) liability auto insurance. The minimum liability limits are 30/60/15 – $30,000 bodily injury limit for a single person, $60,000 bodily injury limit on the entire accident, and a $15,000 property damage limit.
Maryland also requires drivers to have a personal injury protection (PIP) policy, with a minimum limit of $2,500 per accident.
Drivers in Maryland must also carry uninsured motorist (UM) and underinsured motorist (UIM) coverage. Your UM/UIM coverage must match the liability limits you've chosen for your BI and PD liability coverage.

Massachusetts

Massachusetts requires drivers to have both bodily injury (BI) and property damage (PD) liability auto insurance. The minimum liability limits are 20/40/5 – $20,000 bodily injury limit for a single person, $40,000 bodily injury limit on the entire accident, and a $5,000 property damage limit.
Massachusetts also requires drivers to have a personal injury protection (PIP) policy, with a minimum limit of $8,000 per accident.
In addition the PIP policy, Massachusetts drivers must carry a type of uninsured motorist coverage called "bodily injury caused by an uninsured auto" coverage. The required minimums for this coverage are $20,000 per person and $40,000 per accident.

Michigan

Michigan requires drivers to have both bodily injury (BI) and property damage (PD) liability auto insurance. The minimum liability limits are 20/40/10 – $20,000 bodily injury limit for a single person, $40,000 bodily injury limit on the entire accident, and a $10,000 property damage limit.
Michigan also requires drivers to carry personal injury protection (PIP) coverage, though the exact amount required depends on the type and amount of health insurance coverage they have.
Michigan also requires property protection insurance (PPI), with a minimum limit of $1 million in property damage coverage. PPI can cover damages regardless of who caused the accident, as Michigan is a no fault state.

Minnesota

Minnesota requires drivers to have both bodily injury (BI) and property damage (PD) liability auto insurance. The minimum liability limits are 30/60/10 – $30,000 bodily injury limit for a single person, $60,000 bodily injury limit on the entire accident, and a $10,000 property damage limit.
Minnesota also requires drivers to carry personal injury protection (PIP) coverage. The minimum limits for PIP coverage in Minnesota are $20,000 for medical coverage per accident and $20,000 for loss of income per accident.
In addition to these types of insurance, Minnesota also requires that driver carry uninsured motorist (UM) and underinsured motorist (UIM) coverage, with minimum limits of $25,000 per person and $50,000 per accident.

Mississippi

Mississippi requires drivers to have both bodily injury (BI) and property damage (PD) liability auto insurance. The minimum liability limits are 25/50/25 – $25,000 bodily injury limit for a single person, $50,000 bodily injury limit on the entire accident, and a $25,000 property damage limit.

Missouri

Missouri requires drivers to have both bodily injury (BI) and property damage (PD) liability auto insurance. The minimum liability limits are 25/50/10 – $25,000 bodily injury limit for a single person, $50,000 bodily injury limit on the entire accident, and a $10,000 property damage limit.
Missouri also requires drivers to hold uninsured motorist (UM) coverage. The minimum limits are the same as those listed for liability coverage.
Missouri drivers can comply with these rules without buying car insurance – drivers can instead submit proof of financial responsibility to the Department of Revenue. However, insurance is a much more common and cheaper way to comply with these rules.

Montana

Montana requires drivers to have both bodily injury (BI) and property damage (PD) liability auto insurance. The minimum liability limits are 25/50/20 – $25,000 bodily injury limit for a single person, $50,000 bodily injury limit on the entire accident, and a $20,000 property damage limit.

Nebraska

Nebraska requires drivers to have both bodily injury (BI) and property damage (PD) liability auto insurance. The minimum liability limits are 25/50/25 – $25,000 bodily injury limit for a single person, $50,000 bodily injury limit on the entire accident, and a $25,000 property damage limit.
Nebraska law also requires that drivers carry uninsured motorist (UM) and underinsured motorist (UIM) coverage with minimum limits of $25,000 per person and $50,000 per accident.

Nevada

Nevada requires drivers to have both bodily injury (BI) and property damage (PD) liability auto insurance. The minimum liability limits are 15/30/10 – $15,000 bodily injury limit for a single person, $30,000 bodily injury limit on the entire accident, and a $10,000 property damage limit.

New Hampshire

While New Hampshire does not require that drivers carry car insurance, you are still responsible for paying for bodily injury damages and property damages if you cause a car accident. The easiest way to do this? Insurance!
If you do choose to buy car insurance in New Hampshire, there are some minimum requirements. You must buy liability insurance with minimum liability limits of 25/50/25 – $25,000 bodily injury limit for a single person, $50,000 bodily injury limit on the entire accident, and a $25,000 property damage limit.
You also need to have medical payments coverage with a minimum of $1,000 per accident and uninsured motorist (UM) coverage with limits that match your liability coverage.
If you can’t afford to buy car insurance, you may be able to get coverage through the New Hampshire Automobile Insurance Plan. You can apply for coverage from this plan through any New Hampshire auto insurance company that participates in the plan.

New Jersey

New Jersey’s Standard auto insurance policy features both bodily injury (BI) and property damage (PD) liability auto insurance. The minimum liability limits are 15/30/5 – $15,000 bodily injury limit for a single person, $30,000 bodily injury limit on the entire accident, and a $5,000 property damage limit.
The Standard policy option also includes a minimum of $15,000 in personal injury protection (PIP) per person and a PIP policy for severe injuries of up to $250,000.
There is also a Basic policy option with $5,000 of PD liability coverage, $15,000 of PIP per person, and up to $250,000 of PIP for severe injuries.
New Jersey also requires that all drivers carry uninsured motorist (UM) coverage, with minimum liability limits matching their Standard liability minimum limits.

New Mexico

New Mexico requires drivers to have both bodily injury (BI) and property damage (PD) liability auto insurance. The minimum liability limits are 25/50/10 – $25,000 bodily injury limit for a single person, $50,000 bodily injury limit on the entire accident, and a $10,000 property damage limit.

New York

New York requires drivers to have both bodily injury (BI) and property damage (PD) liability auto insurance. The minimum liability limits are 25/50/10 – $25,000 bodily injury limit for a single person, $50,000 bodily injury limit on the entire accident, and a $10,000 property damage limit.
New York also requires that you carry wrongful death coverage, with minimum limits of $50,000 for one death per accident and $100,000 for multiple deaths per accident.
New York is also a no fault state, and requires that you carry a form of personal injury protection (PIP) coverage called "no-fault coverage." This coverage has a minimum limit of $50,000.
On top of all that, New York requires uninsured motorist (UM) coverage, with minimum limits of $25,000 per person and $50,000 per accident.

North Carolina

North Carolina requires drivers to have both bodily injury (BI) and property damage (PD) liability auto insurance. The minimum liability limits are 30/60/25 – $30,000 bodily injury limit for a single person, $60,000 bodily injury limit on the entire accident, and a $25,000 property damage limit.
North Carolina also requires that drivers carry uninsured motorist (UM) and underinsured motorist (UIM) coverage equal to the highest bodily injury limit on their liability insurance.

North Dakota

North Dakota requires drivers to have both bodily injury (BI) and property damage (PD) liability auto insurance. The minimum liability limits are 25/50/25 – $25,000 bodily injury limit for a single person, $50,000 bodily injury limit on the entire accident, and a $25,000 property damage limit.
North Dakota also requires drivers to carry uninsured motorist (UM) and underinsured motorist (UIM) coverage with minimums of $25,000 per person and $50,000 per accident.
In addition to these types of coverage, drivers must also carry a personal injury protection (PIP) policy with a minimum limit of $30,000 per person.

Ohio

Ohio requires drivers to have both bodily injury (BI) and property damage (PD) liability auto insurance. The minimum liability limits are 25/50/25 – $25,000 bodily injury limit for a single person, $50,000 bodily injury limit on the entire accident, and a $25,000 property damage limit.

Oklahoma

Oklahoma requires drivers to have both bodily injury (BI) and property damage (PD) liability auto insurance. The minimum liability limits are 25/50/25 – $25,000 bodily injury limit for a single person, $50,000 bodily injury limit on the entire accident, and a $25,000 property damage limit.

Oregon

Oregon requires drivers to have both bodily injury (BI) and property damage (PD) liability auto insurance. The minimum liability limits are 25/50/20 – $25,000 bodily injury limit for a single person, $50,000 bodily injury limit on the entire accident, and a $20,000 property damage limit.
Oregon also requires that drivers carry personal injury protection (PIP) coverage with a minimum limit of $15,000 per person. The state also requires that drivers carry uninsured motorist (UM) coverage, with minimum limits that are equal to the state’s liability insurance minimums.

Pennsylvania

Pennsylvania requires drivers to have both bodily injury (BI) and property damage (PD) liability auto insurance. The minimum liability limits are 15/30/5 – $15,000 bodily injury limit for a single person, $30,000 bodily injury limit on the entire accident, and a $5,000 property damage limit.
Pennsylvania is a no fault state, which means that drivers must carry a type of personal injury protection (PIP) coverage called medical benefits coverage. The minimum limit on medical benefit coverage is $5,000 per person.

Rhode Island

Rhode Island requires drivers to have both bodily injury (BI) and property damage (PD) liability auto insurance. The minimum liability limits are 25/50/25 – $25,000 bodily injury limit for a single person, $50,000 bodily injury limit on the entire accident, and a $25,000 property damage limit.

South Carolina

South Carolina requires drivers to have both bodily injury (BI) and property damage (PD) liability auto insurance. The minimum liability limits are 25/50/25 – $25,000 bodily injury limit for a single person, $50,000 bodily injury limit on the entire accident, and a $25,000 property damage limit.
South Carolina also requires that drivers carry uninsured motorist (UM) coverage with minimum limits equal to the liability limits outlined above.

South Dakota

South Dakota requires drivers to have both bodily injury (BI) and property damage (PD) liability auto insurance. The minimum liability limits are 25/50/25 – $25,000 bodily injury limit for a single person, $50,000 bodily injury limit on the entire accident, and a $25,000 property damage limit.
South Dakota also requires that drivers carry uninsured motorist (UM) and underinsured motorist (UIM) coverage.

Tennessee

Tennessee requires drivers to have both bodily injury (BI) and property damage (PD) liability auto insurance. The minimum liability limits are 25/50/15 – $25,000 bodily injury limit for a single person, $50,000 bodily injury limit on the entire accident, and a $15,000 property damage limit.

Texas

Texas requires drivers to have both bodily injury (BI) and property damage (PD) liability auto insurance. The minimum liability limits are 30/60/25 – $30,000 bodily injury limit for a single person, $60,000 bodily injury limit on the entire accident, and a $25,000 property damage limit.

Utah

Utah requires drivers to have both bodily injury (BI) and property damage (PD) liability auto insurance. The minimum liability limits are 25/65/15 – $25,000 bodily injury limit for a single person, $65,000 bodily injury limit on the entire accident, and a $15,000 property damage limit.
Utah also requires that drivers carry personal injury protection (PIP) coverage with a minimum limit of $3,000 per person.

Vermont

Vermont requires drivers to have both bodily injury (BI) and property damage (PD) liability auto insurance. The minimum liability limits are 25/50/10 – $25,000 bodily injury limit for a single person, $50,000 bodily injury limit on the entire accident, and a $10,000 property damage limit.

Virginia

Virginia requires drivers to have both bodily injury (BI) and property damage (PD) liability auto insurance. The minimum liability limits are 25/50/20 – $25,000 bodily injury limit for a single person, $50,000 bodily injury limit on the entire accident, and a $20,000 property damage limit.
Virginia also requires drivers to carry uninsured motorist (UM) and underinsured motorist (UIM) coverage, with limits that match their liability coverage.
You can also pay the Virginia DMV a fee of $500 to drive uninsured. This will not protect you financially, and if you cause a car accident, you are financially responsible for all bodily injuries and property damage that you cause.

Washington

Washington requires drivers to have both bodily injury (BI) and property damage (PD) liability auto insurance. The minimum liability limits are 25/50/10 – $25,000 bodily injury limit for a single person, $50,000 bodily injury limit on the entire accident, and a $10,000 property damage limit.

West Virginia

West Virginia requires drivers to have both bodily injury (BI) and property damage (PD) liability auto insurance. The minimum liability limits are 25/40/10 – $25,000 bodily injury limit for a single person, $40,000 bodily injury limit on the entire accident, and a $10,000 property damage limit.
West Virginia also requires that drivers carry uninsured motorist (UM) and underinsured motorist (UIM) coverage with limits that match their liability coverage. However, auto insurance companies are limited to offering drivers maximum limits of 100/300/50.

Wisconsin

Wisconsin requires drivers to have both bodily injury (BI) and property damage (PD) liability auto insurance. The minimum liability limits are 25/50/10 – $25,000 bodily injury limit for a single person, $50,000 bodily injury limit on the entire accident, and a $10,000 property damage limit.
Wisconsin also requires that drivers carry uninsured motorist (UM) and underinsured motorist (UIM) coverage with minimum limits of $100,000 per person and $300,000 per accident.

Wyoming

Wyoming requires drivers to have both bodily injury (BI) and property damage (PD) liability auto insurance. The minimum liability limits are 25/50/20 – $25,000 bodily injury limit for a single person, $50,000 bodily injury limit on the entire accident, and a $20,000 property damage limit.
Information in this article is sourced from the Insurance Information Institute and individual state DMV offices.
Image: José Cuervo Elorza