A state-by-state guide to voter IDs: Am I prepared for Election Day?

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A state-by-state guide to voter IDs: Am I prepared for Election Day?

Voting is one of the smartest moves you can make to protect your finances: Your elected officials make decisions that could affect the cost of your health care, the amount you have to pay in taxes, how your tax dollars are spent and the government benefits programs you may rely on to survive. Lawmakers also have a direct influence on the types of jobs available in your state and the workplace protections in place to keep you employed, well paid and not overworked.

Our right to vote is the foundation of our democratic republic. In recent years, in order to enforce the law of one person, one vote, many state governments have begun requiring citizens to obtain a voter ID to cast a ballot. By presenting identification at your polling place, you prove you’re only voting once.

Voter IDs may disenfranchise voters

But not every person who is eligible to vote has an acceptable form of ID. This has the effect of disenfranchising some people, particularly low-income voters, voters of color and out-of-state students, who don’t always have the ability to take off work to go their local DMV.

It’s also not clear that the ends justify the means. In 2016, more than 137 million people voted in the general presidential election, but more people ran for president than cast a fraudulent ballot for one.

To help you get the identification you need to ensure you can vote in November, we’ve prepared this handy state-by-state guide to the types of ID that are acceptable in each state (and the District of Columbia). Note that some places may not require you to present an ID unless you’re a first-time voter. If you’re eligible to vote with an absentee ballot, most states do not require you to submit identification if you choose to vote that way.

Alabama

ID required: Yes
ID types accepted: Driver’s license, student ID from a college or university in the state of Alabama (including postgraduate technical or professional schools), nondriver ID, federal ID or state-issued ID from any state, U.S. passport, military ID, tribal ID
Photo required? Yes
Can you apply for a voter ID card online? No
Your options if you don’t have ID: You’ll have to vote on a provisional ballot, but you’ll have to bring acceptable ID to your local board of elections by 5 p.m. the Friday after the election for your vote to count. However, you can vote on a regular ballot if you can be identified by two election officials.
Exceptions to voter ID requirements: None

Alaska

ID required: Yes
ID types accepted: Driver’s license, state or military ID, voter ID card, hunting or fishing license, passport, other photo ID, utility bill, paycheck or bank statement, government-issued document including a check
Photo required? No
Your options if you don’t have ID: You’ll have to vote on a questioned ballot unless an election official can personally identify you, in which case you can use a regular ballot.
Exceptions to voter ID requirements: None

Arizona

ID required: Yes, but Arizona does not have a distinct form of ID called a voter ID
ID types accepted: One of: government-issued photo ID containing name and address from either the state of Arizona or another federal, state, or local jurisdiction, or tribal enrollment card; or, two of: utility bill dated within 90 days of the election, bank statement, tribal enrollment card without a photo or Indian census card, Arizona vehicle registration or insurance card, property tax statement, certificate from the office of the county recorder
Photo required? No, but you need more than one form of ID if using non-photo IDs to vote, or a combination of photo and non-photo IDs if the photo ID does not contain an address (like a passport or military ID) or the address on the photo ID does not match that listed in the precinct register
Your options if you don’t have ID: You’ll have to vote with a provisional ballot, which will only be counted if you provide identification within five business days after a federal election or three days after non-federal elections
Exceptions to voter ID requirements: None

Arkansas

ID required: Yes
ID types accepted: Driver’s license, concealed-carry handgun license, U.S. passport, employee badge, military ID, student ID from an accredited postsecondary educational institution in Arkansas, public assistance ID, or voter verification card
Photo required? Yes
Your options if you don’t have ID: You may vote with a provisional ballot, which must be confirmed either by the county board of elections or by yourself by presenting valid ID to the county board of elections by noon on the first Monday after the election. Voter verification cards are sent to the voter when he or she registers to vote.
Exceptions to voter ID requirements: None.

California

ID required: No, unless you’re voting for the first time and didn’t provide your driver’s license number when you registered to vote.
ID types accepted: If you’re a first-time voter and you didn’t provide your driver’s license number when you registered to vote, you need to bring some form of ID the first time you vote. The types of eligible IDs in California are broad, and include everything from a driver’s license to a utility bill to a health club ID.
Photo required? No
Your options if you don’t have ID: N/A
Exceptions to voter ID requirements: N/A

Colorado

ID required: Yes
ID types accepted: Colorado ID; Colorado driver’s license; U.S. passport, certified copy of a birth certificate, or certified document of naturalization; employee ID with photograph issued by a federal, state, municipal or other government office subdivision; pilot’s license; military or veteran ID issued by the Department of Veterans Affairs with photo; certificate of Degree of Indian or Alaskan Native Blood or tribal ID; student ID for a Colorado-based institution of higher education; Medicare or Medicaid card; utility bill, bank statement, government document including checks that shows your address
Photo required? Yes, for most forms of ID.
Your options if you don’t have ID: Colorado issues free identification to those who are eligible, but you need to apply ahead of time. If you don’t have ID in time, you’ll have to vote with a provisional ballot that will be evaluated by an election official.
Exceptions to voter ID requirements: Verifying that you’re a resident of a nursing home or nursing care facility; verifying that you’re incarcerated in a juvenile facility and eligible to register and vote.

Connecticut

ID required: Yes, but if you don’t have one, you can sign an affidavit instead.
ID types accepted: For first-time voters, you’ll need a current photo ID with your name or address on it or a current utility bill, bank statement, government check, paycheck or government document with your name and address. If you’ve voted before, you only need a Social Security card or another form of ID that shows your name and either your address, signature, or photograph, including a credit card or checkbook.
Photo required? No.
Your options if you don’t have ID: If you’re a first-time voter, you may have to vote with a provisional ballot. If you’ve voted before, you can sign an affidavit and vote with a regular ballot.
Exceptions to voter ID requirements: None.

Delaware

ID required: No, but if you don’t have one, a poll worker will have you fill out an affidavit form before you can vote.
ID types accepted: Delaware driver’s license or photo ID; Social Security card; U.S. passport; signed vehicle registration; signed credit card with photo; any other document that identifies you with either a photo or signature
Photo required? No.
Your options if you don’t have ID: You’ll have to fill out a provisional ballot if the poll worker cannot confirm your eligibility, which may not be counted if you are not registered to vote, in the wrong voting district, file an incomplete affidavit, or vote for a different party than the one you’re registered to in a primary election.
Exceptions to voter ID requirements: None.

District of Columbia

ID required: No, unless you registered during the Early Voting period, at the polling place on Election Day, or are a first-time voter who registered by mail and did not provide proof of residence. If you’ve voted before, you do not need to show ID. You may be asked to show ID to enter some polling locations.
ID types accepted: District of Columbia ID; government check, paycheck or bank statement; utility bill (except cell phone) or tuition bill; student housing statement, homeless shelter occupancy statement, or lease; government document that shows your name and address
Photo required? No, but ID must include your name and address.
Your options if you don’t have ID: You’ll have to vote with a provisional ballot.
Exceptions to voter ID requirements: None.

Florida

ID required: Yes.
ID types accepted: Florida driver’s license or ID card issued by the Department Highway Safety and Motor Vehicles; U.S. passport, military ID, veteran health ID card issued by the Department of Veterans Affairs, or employee ID card from any office of the federal and state government, county, or municipality; debit or credit card; student ID; retirement center ID; neighborhood association ID; public assistance ID; license to carry a concealed weapon or firearm
Photo required? Yes and a signature is required, too.
Your options if you don’t have ID: You’ll have to vote with a provisional ballot, which will only be counted if your signature on the ballot matches that on your voter registration.
Exceptions to voter ID requirements: None.

Georgia

ID required: Yes.
ID types accepted: Georgia driver’s license; state- or federally issued ID, including student ID from a Georgia institute of higher education; voter ID; employee ID card from any office of the federal and state government, county, or municipality, or other entity of Georgia; U.S. passport or military ID, tribal ID
Photo required? Yes.
Your options if you don’t have ID: Georgia offers a free voter ID card at any county registrar or Department of Driver Services office. You’ll need to show a photo ID or an ID without a photo that includes your legal name and date of birth, voter registration, and documentation showing your name and address. If you’re unable to get this voter ID card before the election, you’ll have to vote with a provisional ballot and have three days after the election to provide acceptable identification at your county registrar office.
Exceptions to voter ID requirements: None.

Hawaii

ID required: Not specified by law, but the Hawaii Board of Elections requests you bring one anyway.
ID types accepted: Driver’s license, state ID, or any other type of photo ID; utility bill, bank statement, paycheck, or other government-issued document displaying your name and address.
Photo required? No.
Your options if you don’t have ID: Confirming your address and date of birth with the poll worker if requested.
Exceptions to voter ID requirements: None.

Idaho

ID required: Yes, but a signed affidavit containing your personal information is also acceptable.
ID types accepted: Idaho driver’s license or ID card issued by the Idaho Transportation Department; U.S. passport or other photo ID card issued by the U.S. government; Idaho student ID from an accredited institution, including high school, college, or technical school; tribal ID.
Photo required? Yes.
Your options if you don’t have ID: You can vote but you must sign a personal identification affidavit.
Exceptions to voter ID requirements: None.

Illinois

ID required: No, unless you’re a first-time voter who registered by mail.
ID types accepted: For first-time voters only, any of the following as long as it includes your name and address: a current photo ID, including driver’s license and municipal ID; a utility bill, bank statement, government check, paycheck, or lease or contract for residence; student ID and mail addressed to your residence; government-issued document.
Photo required? No.
Your options if you don’t have ID: You’ll have to vote using a provisional ballot.
Exceptions to voter ID requirements: None.

Indiana

ID required: Yes.
ID types accepted: Any government-issued photo ID, including Indiana photo ID or driver’s license, military ID, or U.S. passport, or a student ID from a public Indiana state school, that meets the following four criteria: displays your photo; displays your name and conforms to the name or some variant of it on your voter registration record; has a current expiration date or has expired since the date of the last general election; is issued by Indiana or the federal government.
Photo required? Yes.
Your options if you don’t have ID: You’ll have to vote using a provisional ballot and confirm your identity with the board of elections by noon 10 days after the election.
Exceptions to voter ID requirements: Religious objection to being photographed, indigence, living in a state-licensed facility that serves as your polling place.

Iowa

ID required: Yes.
ID types accepted: Iowa driver’s license or non-operator’s ID; U.S. passport, military or veteran ID; voter ID card; student ID showing photo and expiration date. In 2018, if you don’t have one of these forms of ID, you’ll have to sign an affidavit verifying your identity but you’ll be able to use a regular ballot. Starting Jan. 1, 2019, those without ID will only be offered a provisional ballot.
Photo required? Yes
Your options if you don’t have ID: Registered voters who lack a driver’s license or not-operator’s ID will be issued a free voter ID card in the mail. (Check with your local registrar’s office to confirm that yours is on the way.) For 2018, if you don’t bring any ID to the polling location, you can sign an oath confirming your identity. Starting 2019, you’ll have to vote with a provisional ballot.
Exceptions to voter ID requirements: None.

Kansas

ID required: Yes.
ID types accepted: Driver’s license or nondriver’s ID issued by any state or district in the U.S.; U.S. passport; concealed-carry of handgun license issued by any state or district in the U.S.; military ID, including retired military; government employee ID issued by a municipal, county, state, or federal office; public assistance ID; tribal ID; student or employee ID from a Kansas high school or public college; library card; emergency management and first-responder card; pool pass. If the form of ID you present has an expiration date, it must be current unless you’re over age 65.
Photo required? Yes.
Your options if you don’t have ID: You’ll have to vote using a provisional ballot and have seven to 10 days to present a valid photo ID.
Exceptions to voter ID requirements: Religious objection to being photographed.

Kentucky

ID required: Yes.
ID types accepted: Driver’s license; Kentucky-issued ID card with photo; county-issued ID approved in writing by the Board of Elections; Social Security card; any ID containing both photo and signature; credit card; personal acquaintance with a precinct election officer.
Photo required? No.
Your options if you don’t have ID: You’ll have to vote using a provisional ballot.
Exceptions to voter ID requirements: None.

Louisiana

ID required: Yes, but if you don’t have an ID you can qualify to vote by completing a voter identification affidavit.
ID types accepted: Louisiana driver’s license or special identification card; most other ID cards that contain a name, photograph and signature.
Photo required? Yes.
Your options if you don’t have ID: You can get a free Louisiana special identification card at your local Office of Motor Vehicles. If you go to vote and don’t have ID, or if your ID doesn’t have a photo, you can sign a voter identification affidavit subject to challenge by law.
Exceptions to voter ID requirements: None.

Maine

ID required: No.
ID types accepted: N/A
Photo required? N/A
Your options if you don’t have ID: N/A
Exceptions to voter ID requirements: N/A

Maryland

ID required: No, except for some first-time voters.
ID types accepted: First-time voters who are asked to show ID can show a state- or federal government-issued photo ID, including a driver’s license or nondriver Maryland Motor Vehicle Administration ID, U.S. passport, or military ID; student or employee ID; or a current non-photo ID dated within three months of the election, including a utility bill, bank statement; government check; paycheck; or any other government document with your name and address on it.
Photo required? No.
Your options if you don’t have ID: You’ll have to vote using a provisional ballot and prove your identity to the Board of Elections before 10 a.m. on the second Wednesday after the election.
Exceptions to voter ID requirements: None.

Massachusetts

ID required: No, unless you’re voting in a federal election for the first time, have been inactive, are casting a provisional or challenged ballot, or the poll worker has a reasonable suspicion.
ID types accepted: If you fall under one of those four categories, you can show a driver’s license; state-issued ID card; recent utility bill, rent receipt, or lease; voter registration affidavit; any documentation that shows your name and address.
Photo required? No.
Your options if you don’t have ID: You’ll have to vote using a provisional or challenged ballot and prove your identity later.
Exceptions to voter ID requirements: None.

Michigan

ID required: Yes.
ID types accepted: Driver’s license or other ID card from any state; federal or state government-issued photo ID; U.S. passport; student ID from high school or an accredited institute of high education; military ID; tribal ID.
Photo required? Yes, but if your ID doesn’t have a photo, you can still vote normally by signing an affidavit at your polling location.
Your options if you don’t have ID: You can sign an affidavit and vote on a regular ballot. You can also get a state ID from your Secretary of State’s branch office for $10 (free if you’re over 65 or blind).
Exceptions to voter ID requirements: None.

Minnesota

ID required: No, unless you’re registering at the polls, have registered less than 21 days before Election Day, haven’t voted in more than four years and haven’t moved or changed names since registering.
ID types accepted: If you need to bring ID, you can choose from any of the following: a Minnesota driver’s license, learner’s permit, or a receipt; or tribal ID with name, address, photo, or signature; or a combination of a driver’s license or tribal ID from any state, tribal ID, U.S. passport, military or veteran’s ID, or student ID from a Minnesota high school, college, or technical school, and a utility bill. bank or credit card. rent, mortgage, or tuition statement, or lease. You can also bring a registered voter who can confirm your address or bring someone to vouch for you if you live in an assisted-living facility. College student housing lists are acceptable, as is valid registration in the same precinct and the notice of late registration that you’d receive if you register within 20 days of the election.
Photo required? No.
Your options if you don’t have ID: None, because Minnesota has same-day registration.
Exceptions to voter ID requirements: None.

Mississippi

ID required: Yes.
ID types accepted: Any type of photo ID issued by an office of the U.S. government or a state government, including driver’s license, U.S. passport, military ID, or government employee ID; firearms license; tribal ID; student ID for an accredited Mississippi college, including community and junior college; Mississippi voter ID card
Photo required? Yes.
Your options if you don’t have ID: You can get a free Mississippi Voter Identification Card at any circuit clerk’s office. The receipt you receive from applying for the card is also valid. If you don’t have an ID, you can vote by affidavit ballot, but you will have to show a valid photo ID at the circuit clerk’s office within five days of the election for your vote to count.
Exceptions to voter ID requirements: Religious objection to being photographed; any registered voter who resides at a state-licensed care facility who votes in person at that facility.

Missouri

ID required: Yes.
ID types accepted: Photo ID, including a Missouri driver’s license or nondriver ID; U.S. passport; military ID; or any other form of ID from the Missouri or federal government that contains a photo, signature, an expiration date (and had not expired as of the most recent general election); non-photo ID, including a voter registration card, utility bill, bank statement, government check, paycheck, or another government document showing your name and address; student ID from a Missouri institute of higher education when accompanied by a signed affidavit.
Photo required? No, but if you use a non-photo ID to vote you have to sign an affidavit.
Your options if you don’t have ID: You can apply online for a free nondriver photo ID. If you come to the polling place without ID, you’ll have to use a provisional ballot, but your vote will only count if you return to your polling place with photo ID or your signature on the ballot matches that in the voter register.
Exceptions to voter ID requirements: None.

Montana

ID required: Yes.
ID types accepted: Any current photo ID showing your name; or a document showing your current name and address such as a utility bill, bank statement, government check, paycheck, voter registration, or any other government document.
Photo required? No.
Your options if you don’t have ID: You can either fill out a Polling Place Elector ID form or a provisional ballot.
Exceptions to voter ID requirements: None.

Nebraska

ID required: No.
ID types accepted: N/A
Photo required? N/A
Your options if you don’t have ID: N/A
Exceptions to voter ID requirements: N/A

Nevada

ID required: No.
ID types accepted: N/A
Photo required? N/A
Your options if you don’t have ID: N/A
Exceptions to voter ID requirements: N/A

New Hampshire

ID required: Yes.
ID types accepted: Driver’s license or nondriver ID card issued by any state or the U.S. government; “voter identification only” photo ID card issued by the New Hampshire Department of Motor Vehicles; military ID; U.S. passport or passport card; a photo ID otherwise determined to be legitimate by a government official, although if your vote is challenged you’ll have to sign an affidavit; personal acquaintance with “a moderator or supervisor of the checklist or clerk of a town, ward or city.” Student IDs are also acceptable if they contain a photo, are from a public high school or an institute of higher learning licensed to operate in New Hampshire, an accredited private high school, or Dartmouth College.
Photo required? Yes.
Your options if you don’t have ID: You may vote using a challenged voter affidavit. If you don’t have a photo ID, you can obtain a free “voter identification only” ID at your local DMV.
Exceptions to voter ID requirements: Religious objection to having your photograph taken.

New Jersey

ID required: No, unless you didn’t provide identification when you registered or if it could not be verified.
ID types accepted: If you’re required to show any ID, it can be any government ID, including a driver’s license, military ID, U.S. passport, or New Jersey nonphoto driver’s license; student ID; employee ID; store membership card; rent receipt or utility bill; bank statement or government check; any other kind of government document; car registration; sample ballot
Photo required? No.
Your options if you don’t have ID: You’ll have to vote with a provisional ballot.
Exceptions to voter ID requirements: None.

New Mexico

ID required: No, unless you registered to vote by mail or are voting for the first time, and didn’t submit your identification when you registered.
ID types accepted: Any current photo ID; utility bill; bank statement, government check, or paycheck; student ID; any other kind of government document that shows your name and current address; Indian nation, tribe, or pueblo ID
Photo required? No.
Your options if you don’t have ID: You’ll have to give a verbal or written statement of identification.
Exceptions to voter ID requirements: None.

New York

ID required: No, unless you registered to vote after Jan. 1, 2013, and have not previously voted in a federal election.
ID types accepted: If you’re required to show ID, you can use any current photo ID; utility bill; bank statement, government check, or paycheck; any other kind of government document that shows your name and current address.
Photo required? No.
Your options if you don’t have ID: You’ll have to vote with an affidavit ballot.
Exceptions to voter ID requirements: None.

North Carolina

ID required: No. However, lawmakers in North Carolina have attempted to enact strict voter ID requirements that were only recently struck down by the courts. It’s reasonable to expect new voter ID requirements again in the future.
ID types accepted: N/A
Photo required? N/A
Your options if you don’t have ID: N/A
Exceptions to voter ID requirements: N/A

North Dakota

ID required: Yes.
ID types accepted: North Dakota makes a distinction between IDs accepted at the polling location and voting absentee by mail. Both types must include the voter’s name, address and date of birth. IDs accepted at the polling place: a North Dakota driver’s license or nondriver ID card; tribal ID; long-term care ID certificate from a North Dakota facility. IDs accepted when voting absentee: any of the forms of ID listed previously; U.S. passport or military ID; or someone with his or her own proper ID can attest to your identity.
Photo required? No.
Your options if you don’t have ID: You may still vote, but on a ballot that will be “securely set aside” and only included in the vote tally if you bring valid identification. If you don’t have ID, you can get a nondriver ID card for $8
Exceptions to voter ID requirements: None.

Ohio

ID required: Yes.
ID types accepted: Current Ohio driver’s license or state ID card that contains an address that matches your voter registration; current photo ID issued by the U.S. government that contains your name and address; military ID; utility bill, cell phone bill, bank statement, government check, paycheck, or another government document that shows your name and current address. Government documents include fishing and marine equipment operator’s licenses, court papers, and school documentation, but not notices of voter registration.
Photo required? No.
Your options if you don’t have ID: You’ll have to vote with a provisional ballot that includes either your driver’s license number or the last four digits of your Social Security number.
Exceptions to voter ID requirements: None.

Oklahoma

ID required: Yes.
ID types accepted: Any document issued by the state of Oklahoma, the U.S. government, or a federally recognized tribal government that has your name, photo, and a current expiration date. These include a driver’s license, nondriver ID card, U.S. passport, military ID, and a free voter identification card provided when you registered to vote. The name on your ID has to “substantially conform” to the one on your voter registration, so if your ID says Rick Grimes, your voter registration can be such variations as Richard Grimes and Ricky Grimes.
Photo required? Yes.
Your options if you don’t have ID: You should receive a free voter ID from your county board of elections when you register. If you don’t have any ID, you’ll have to vote using a provisional ballot, providing your driver’s license number or the last four digits of your Social Security number, which have to match your voter registration for it to be counted.
Exceptions to voter ID requirements: None.

Oregon

ID required: No.
ID types accepted: N/A
Photo required? N/A
Your options if you don’t have ID: N/A
Exceptions to voter ID requirements: N/A

Pennsylvania

ID required: No, unless you’re a first-time voter.
ID types accepted: If you’re a first-time voter, you’ll need one of the following: driver’s license; PennDOT ID card; ID issued by the U.S. government or any Commonwealth agency; U.S. passport; military ID; student or employee ID; current utility bill, bank statement, paycheck, or government check; firearm permit; voter registration card.
Photo required? No.
Your options if you don’t have ID: You’ll have to vote using a provisional ballot if you don’t have acceptable ID and you’re voting for the first time.
Exceptions to voter ID requirements: None.

Rhode Island

ID required: Yes.
ID types accepted: Rhode Island driver’s license or permit; free Rhode Island voter ID card; U.S. passport; student ID; military ID; tribal ID; government-issued medical card, or any photo ID issued by the U.S. or Rhode Island
Photo required? Yes.
Your options if you don’t have ID: If you don’t have ID, the Rhode Island Department of State will issue you a [free voter ID card.] If you don’t bring any form of ID to the polls, you’ll have to vote with a provisional ballot.
Exceptions to voter ID requirements: None.

South Carolina

ID required: Yes.
ID types accepted: South Carolina driver’s license or Department of Motor Vehicles ID card; voter registration; military or Department of Veterans Affairs ID; U.S. passport and passport card; free voter ID from your voter registration office or DMV
Photo required? Yes.
Your options if you don’t have ID: You can get a free photo ID from your local voter registration office or DMV. You’ll have to provide your date of birth and Social Security number and have to follow attire and appearance guidelines when you have your photo taken. If you don’t bring any ID to the polls, you’ll have to vote with a provisional ballot.
Exceptions to voter ID requirements: Having a “reasonable impediment to obtaining photo ID”; religious objection to being photographed.

South Dakota

ID required: Yes.
ID types accepted: South Dakota driver’s license or nondriver ID; U.S. government-issued ID; U.S. passport; military ID; tribal ID; current student ID from a South Dakota high school or accredited institution of higher education
Photo required? Yes, but if you don’t have one, you can still vote on a regular ballot after signing a personal identification audit.
Your options if you don’t have ID: You can sign an affidavit and vote on a regular ballot.
Exceptions to voter ID requirements: None.

Tennessee

ID required: Yes.
ID types accepted: Tennessee driver’s license or photo ID issued by the Department of Safety and Homeland Security; photo ID issued by the federal or Tennessee state government; U.S. passport; military ID; Tennessee handgun carry permit.
Photo required? Yes.
Your options if you don’t have ID: You’ll have to vote using a provisional ballot and prove your identity with one of the accepted forms of ID at the election commission office within two days.
Exceptions to voter ID requirements: Religious objection to being photographed; indigence; if you live in a nursing home or assisted-living center that is also the facility at which you vote; if you’re hospitalized

Texas

ID required: Yes.
ID types accepted: Texas driver’s license, personal ID card, election identification certificate, or handgun license; U.S. military ID or citizenship certificate with photograph; U.S. passport or passport card; government document showing your name and address, including your voter registration; current utility bill, bank statement, government check, paycheck; birth certificate or document “confirming birth admissible in a court of law.”
Photo required? No, but if you use a non-photo ID to vote, you’ll have to complete a “Reasonable Impediment Declaration” to cast a regular ballot.
Your options if you don’t have ID: You’ll have to vote using a provisional ballot and prove your identity to the county registrar within six days of the election or by returning to the polling place polls close to present acceptable or complete the Reasonable Impediment Declaration.
Exceptions to voter ID requirements: Religious objection to being photographed; natural disaster; disability

Utah

ID required: Yes.
ID types accepted: A current form of either: Utah driver’s license; ID card issued by a branch, department, or agency of the U.S.; U.S. passport; Utah permit to carry a concealed weapon; tribal ID; or two of the following, as long as they show your name and that you’re eligible to vote in the precinct: current utility bill dated within 90 days before the election; bank statement, paycheck, government check; Social Security card, birth certificate, certified naturalization document; military ID; hunting and fishing license; employer, local government, or student ID; Utah vehicle registration; government-issued benefits card, including Medicare and Medicaid; Bureau of Indian Affairs or tribal treaty card; adoption or name change records
Photo required? No, but if you don’t have a photo ID, you may have to show two types of non-photo identification documents. You may have to show two forms of ID even with some photo IDs, like student IDs.
Your options if you don’t have ID: You can vote with a provisional ballot and verify your identification by end of day on the Monday following election day. In some cases, the county clerk may be able to verify your eligibility “through some other means.”
Exceptions to voter ID requirements: None.

Vermont

ID required: No, unless you’re voting for the first time after registering to vote by mail.
ID types accepted: Any valid photo ID, including driver’s license or passport; current utility bill, bank statement, government check, or paycheck; another government document that shows your current name and address.
Photo required? No.
Your options if you don’t have ID: You’ll have to vote with a provisional ballot.
Exceptions to voter ID requirements: None.

Virginia

ID required: Yes.
ID types accepted: Virginia driver’s license or Department of Motor Vehicles-issued photo ID; U.S. passport; employer ID; student ID from a school located in Virginia; state or federal government-issued ID; tribal ID; Virginia voter ID card
Photo required? Yes.
Your options if you don’t have ID: You can get a free voter ID card that has your photo by going to your local voter registration office. If you don’t bring your photo ID, you’ll have to vote with a provisional ballot and prove your identity with the county board of elections.
Exceptions to voter ID requirements: None.

Washington

ID required: Yes, but only if you vote in person at your county voting center. The vast majority of Washingtonians vote by mail.
ID types accepted: Driver’s license; state ID; student ID; tribal ID; employer ID.
Photo required? Yes.
Your options if you don’t have ID: You can vote on a provisional ballot, and it will be accepted as long as your signature on the ballot matches that of your voter registration.
Exceptions to voter ID requirements: None.

West Virginia

ID required: Yes.
ID types accepted: Any of the following as long as it’s not expired: driver’s license issued by any state; U.S. passport or passport card; military ID; employee ID card from the federal government or state of West Virginia; student ID card; concealed-carry permit; voter registration; government benefits identification documents, including Medicare, Medicaid, Social Security, Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF), Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP, popularly known as food stamps); birth certificate; bank or debit card; utility bill or bank statement issued within six months of the election; health insurance card; hunting and fishing license
Photo required? No.
Your options if you don’t have ID: You can vote on a provisional ballot. You can also vote on a regular ballot if an adult who has known you for at least six months accompanies you to the polling place and and has a valid photo ID confirming his or her name and residence.
Exceptions to voter ID requirements: None.

Wisconsin

ID required: Yes.
ID types accepted: The following IDs are acceptable if they are unexpired or expired after the date of the last general election: Wisconsin driver’s license (even if revoked or suspended) or ID card; military ID; U.S. passport; tribal ID; student ID from a university or college accredited in Wisconsin that has your signature and an expiration date no later than two years after date of issuance, which must be accompanied by a document that proves enrollment. The following IDs are acceptable only if unexpired: veteran’s ID; certificate of naturalization issued no earlier than two years before the date of the election; receipts for a driver’s license, ID card, or temporary ID card; notice of intent to revoke or suspend a Wisconsin driver’s license.
Photo required? Yes.
Your options if you don’t have ID: You can get a Wisconsin state ID card for free by taking identifying documents like a birth certificate or Social Security card to your local Division of Motor Vehicles office. If you don’t bring any ID to your polling place, you can still vote with a provisional ballot but you’ll have to bring an acceptable ID to polling place before polls close or to the county clerk’s office by 4 p.m. the Friday after the election for your vote to count.
Exceptions to voter ID requirements: Religious objection to having your photograph taken.

Wyoming

ID required: No.
ID types accepted: N/A
Photo required? N/A
Your options if you don’t have ID: N/A
Exceptions to voter ID requirements: N/A